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7.344 RNA Interference: A New Tool for Genetic Analysis and Therapeutics (MIT) 7.344 RNA Interference: A New Tool for Genetic Analysis and Therapeutics (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. To understand and treat any disease with a genetic basis or predisposition, scientists and clinicians need effective ways of manipulating the levels of genes and gene products. Conventional methods for the genetic modification of many experimental organisms are technically demanding and time consuming. Just over 5 years ago, a new mechanism of gene-silencing, termed RNA interference (RNAi), was discovered. In addition to being a fascinating biological process, RNAi provides a revolutionary technology that has a This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. To understand and treat any disease with a genetic basis or predisposition, scientists and clinicians need effective ways of manipulating the levels of genes and gene products. Conventional methods for the genetic modification of many experimental organisms are technically demanding and time consuming. Just over 5 years ago, a new mechanism of gene-silencing, termed RNA interference (RNAi), was discovered. In addition to being a fascinating biological process, RNAi provides a revolutionary technology that has a

Subjects

RNA interference | RNA interference | RNAi | RNAi | RNA | RNA | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | gene therapy | gene therapy | gene products | gene products | gene silencing | gene silencing | gene expression | gene expression | human disease models | human disease models | mRNA | mRNA | genetic interference | genetic interference | short interfering RNA | short interfering RNA | siRNAs | siRNAs | expression vectors | expression vectors | RNA sequences | RNA sequences | nucleotide fragments | nucleotide fragments | microRNA | microRNA | mRNA degradation | mRNA degradation | transgenic mice | transgenic mice | lentivirus | lentivirus | knock-down animals | knock-down animals | tissue specificity | tissue specificity

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design; apertures | lens design; apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

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7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT) 7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Topics include Eukaryotic genome structure, function, and expression, processing of RNA, and regulation of the cell cycle. The techniques and logic used to address important problems in nuclear cell biology is emphasized. Lectures cover broad topic areas in nuclear cell biology and class discussions focus on representative papers recently published in the field. This course covers the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Topics include Eukaryotic genome structure, function, and expression, processing of RNA, and regulation of the cell cycle. The techniques and logic used to address important problems in nuclear cell biology is emphasized. Lectures cover broad topic areas in nuclear cell biology and class discussions focus on representative papers recently published in the field.

Subjects

cell biology | cell biology | nucleus | nucleus | biology | biology | nuclear cell biology | nuclear cell biology | DNA replication | DNA replication | DNA repair | DNA repair | DNA | DNA | genome | genome | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | chromatin | chromatin | gene expression | gene expression | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | RNA | RNA | RNA interference | RNA interference | mRNA | mRNA | microRNA | microRNA | RNAi | RNAi

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points. 6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

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7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT) 7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT)

Description

The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided. The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided.

Subjects

RNAi | RNAi | RNA interference | RNA interference | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Drosophilia | Drosophilia | PCD | PCD | mRNA | mRNA | lab notebook | lab notebook | scientific writing | scientific writing | RT-PCR | RT-PCR | S2 RNA | S2 RNA | S2 | S2 | cell culture | cell culture | genetic transcription | genetic transcription | dsRNA | dsRNA | bioinformatics | bioinformatics

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject. 6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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7.345 Non-coding RNAs: Junk or Critical Regulators in Health and Disease? (MIT) 7.345 Non-coding RNAs: Junk or Critical Regulators in Health and Disease? (MIT)

Description

Every time we scientists think that we have dissected the precise biological nature of a process, an incidental finding, a brilliantly designed experiment, or an unexpected result can turn our world upside down. Until recently thought by many to be cellular "junk" because they do not encode proteins, non-coding RNAs are gaining a growing recognition for their roles in the regulation of a wide scope of processes, ranging from embryogenesis and development to cancer and degenerative disorders. The aim of this class is to introduce the diversity of the RNA world, inhabited by microRNAs, lincRNAs, piRNAs, and many others. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in us Every time we scientists think that we have dissected the precise biological nature of a process, an incidental finding, a brilliantly designed experiment, or an unexpected result can turn our world upside down. Until recently thought by many to be cellular "junk" because they do not encode proteins, non-coding RNAs are gaining a growing recognition for their roles in the regulation of a wide scope of processes, ranging from embryogenesis and development to cancer and degenerative disorders. The aim of this class is to introduce the diversity of the RNA world, inhabited by microRNAs, lincRNAs, piRNAs, and many others. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in us

Subjects

Non-coding RNAs | Non-coding RNAs | microRNAs | microRNAs | lincRNAs | lincRNAs | piRNAs | piRNAs | RNA interference | RNA interference | miRNA | miRNA | tumor suppressors and oncogenes | tumor suppressors and oncogenes | RNAi therapeutics | RNAi therapeutics

License

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7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT) 7.60 Cell Biology: Structure and Functions of the Nucleus (MIT)

Description

The goal of this course is to teach both the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Lectures and class discussions will cover the background and fundamental findings in a particular area of nuclear cell biology. The assigned readings will provide concrete examples of the experimental approaches and logic used to establish these findings. Some examples of topics include genome and systems biology, transcription, and gene expression. The goal of this course is to teach both the fundamentals of nuclear cell biology as well as the methodological and experimental approaches upon which they are based. Lectures and class discussions will cover the background and fundamental findings in a particular area of nuclear cell biology. The assigned readings will provide concrete examples of the experimental approaches and logic used to establish these findings. Some examples of topics include genome and systems biology, transcription, and gene expression.

Subjects

cell biology | cell biology | nucleus | nucleus | biology | biology | nuclear cell biology | nuclear cell biology | DNA replication | DNA replication | DNA repair | DNA repair | DNA | DNA | genome | genome | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | transcriptional regulation | transcriptional regulation | gene expression | gene expression | chromatin | chromatin | chromosomes | chromosomes | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | RNA | RNA | RNA interference | RNA interference | mRNA | mRNA | microRNA | microRNA | RNAi | RNAi

License

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8.03 Physics III (MIT) 8.03 Physics III (MIT)

Description

Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings. Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings.

Subjects

Mechanical vibrations and waves | Mechanical vibrations and waves | simple harmonic motion | simple harmonic motion | superposition | superposition | forced vibrations and resonance | forced vibrations and resonance | coupled oscillations and normal modes | coupled oscillations and normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection and refraction | reflection and refraction | phase and group velocity | phase and group velocity | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | polarization | Snell's Law | Snell's Law | interference | interference | Huygens's principle | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings | gratings

License

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MAS.450 Holographic Imaging (MIT) MAS.450 Holographic Imaging (MIT)

Description

MAS.450 is a laboratory course about holography and holographic imaging. This course teaches holography from a scientific and analytical point of view, moving from interference and diffraction to imaging of single points to the display of three-dimensional images. Using a "hands-on" approach, students explore the underlying physical phenomena that make holograms work, as well as designing laboratory setups to make their own images. The course also teaches mathematical techniques that allow the behavior of holography to be understood, predicted, and harnessed. Holography today brings together the fields of optics, chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering, visualization, three-dimensional display, and human perception in a unique and comprehensive way. As such, MAS.450 offers in MAS.450 is a laboratory course about holography and holographic imaging. This course teaches holography from a scientific and analytical point of view, moving from interference and diffraction to imaging of single points to the display of three-dimensional images. Using a "hands-on" approach, students explore the underlying physical phenomena that make holograms work, as well as designing laboratory setups to make their own images. The course also teaches mathematical techniques that allow the behavior of holography to be understood, predicted, and harnessed. Holography today brings together the fields of optics, chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering, visualization, three-dimensional display, and human perception in a unique and comprehensive way. As such, MAS.450 offers in

Subjects

holography | holography | interference | interference | diffraction | diffraction | imaging of single points | imaging of single points | three-dimensional images | three-dimensional images | "hands-on" approach | "hands-on" approach | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | holograms | holograms

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optics | optics | optical science | optical science | geometrical optics | geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RES.8-005 Vibrations and Waves Problem Solving (MIT) RES.8-005 Vibrations and Waves Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 8.03 Physics III: Vibrations and Waves is the third course in the core physics curriculum at MIT, following 8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics and 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism. Topics include mechanical vibrations and waves, electromagnetic waves, and optics. These Problem Solving Help Videos provide step-by-step solutions to sample problems. Also included is information about how Physics III is typically taught on the MIT campus. Instructor Insights are shared by Professor Wit Busza who has taught Physics III and its associated recitation sessions many times. Professor Busza's insights focus on his approach to problem solving, strategies for supporting students as they solve problems, and common sources of confusion for students i Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 8.03 Physics III: Vibrations and Waves is the third course in the core physics curriculum at MIT, following 8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics and 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism. Topics include mechanical vibrations and waves, electromagnetic waves, and optics. These Problem Solving Help Videos provide step-by-step solutions to sample problems. Also included is information about how Physics III is typically taught on the MIT campus. Instructor Insights are shared by Professor Wit Busza who has taught Physics III and its associated recitation sessions many times. Professor Busza's insights focus on his approach to problem solving, strategies for supporting students as they solve problems, and common sources of confusion for students i

Subjects

vibrations | vibrations | waves | waves | mass on a spring | mass on a spring | LC circuit | LC circuit | simple harmonic motion | simple harmonic motion | harmonic oscillators | harmonic oscillators | damping | damping | coupled oscillators | coupled oscillators | traveling waves | traveling waves | standing waves | standing waves | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | interference | interference | radiating electromagnetic waves | radiating electromagnetic waves | Quality Factor Q | Quality Factor Q

License

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7.344 RNA Interference: A New Tool for Genetic Analysis and Therapeutics (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. To understand and treat any disease with a genetic basis or predisposition, scientists and clinicians need effective ways of manipulating the levels of genes and gene products. Conventional methods for the genetic modification of many experimental organisms are technically demanding and time consuming. Just over 5 years ago, a new mechanism of gene-silencing, termed RNA interference (RNAi), was discovered. In addition to being a fascinating biological process, RNAi provides a revolutionary technology that has a

Subjects

RNA interference | RNAi | RNA | genetic analysis | gene therapy | gene products | gene silencing | gene expression | human disease models | mRNA | genetic interference | short interfering RNA | siRNAs | expression vectors | RNA sequences | nucleotide fragments | microRNA | mRNA degradation | transgenic mice | lentivirus | knock-down animals | tissue specificity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

License

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8.03SC Physics III: Vibrations and Waves (MIT)

Description

This is the third course in the core physics curriculum at MIT, following 8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics and 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism. Topics include mechanical vibrations and waves, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Students will learn about musical instruments, red sunsets, glories, coronae, rainbows, haloes, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, black holes and Big Bang cosmology.

Subjects

mechanical vibrations | waves | simple harmonic motion | superposition | forced vibrations | resonance | coupled oscillations | normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection | refraction | phase | group velocity | Optics | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | Snell's Law | interference | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings | musical instruments | red sunsets | glories | coronae | rainbows | haloes | X-ray binaries | neutron stars | black holes | big-bang cosmology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.03 Physics III: Vibrations and Waves (MIT)

Description

In addition to the traditional topics of mechanical vibrations and waves, coupled oscillators, and electro-magnetic radiation, students will also learn about musical instruments, red sunsets, glories, coronae, rainbows, haloes, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, black holes and big-bang cosmology. OpenCourseWare presents another version of 8.03 that features a full set of lecture notes and take-home experiments. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Classical Mechanics (8.01)- with a complete set of 35 video lectures from the Fall of 1999 Electricity and Magnetism (8.02)- with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Professor of Physics Emeritus Walter Lewin's last MIT lecture, complete with some of his most famous phy

Subjects

mechanical vibrations | waves | simple harmonic motion | superposition | forced vibrations | resonance | coupled oscillations | normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection | refraction | phase | group velocity | Optics | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | Snell's Law | interference | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings | musical instruments | red sunsets | glories | coronae | rainbows | haloes | X-ray binaries | neutron stars | black holes | big-bang cosmology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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TALAT Lecture 1202: Metallography of Aluminium Alloys

Description

This lecture aims at providing a survey of the metallographic techniques available for the examination of aluminium and its alloys. The information must be sufficient to be sure that the students and the users are able to choose the most suitable technique to solve their problems in the examination of samples. The lecture should contain a direct understanding of the main problems in the metallography of the different classes of aluminium materials.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | metallography | sample preparation | grinding | polishing | etching | anodising | electropolishing | dimpling | ion milling | polarised light | electron channelling | interference contrast | high resolution electron microscopy | SEM | TEM | HREM | HVEM | optical microscopy | high voltage electron microscopy | commercial purity | wrought alloys | foundry alloys | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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MAS.450 Holographic Imaging (MIT)

Description

MAS.450 is a laboratory course about holography and holographic imaging. This course teaches holography from a scientific and analytical point of view, moving from interference and diffraction to imaging of single points to the display of three-dimensional images. Using a "hands-on" approach, students explore the underlying physical phenomena that make holograms work, as well as designing laboratory setups to make their own images. The course also teaches mathematical techniques that allow the behavior of holography to be understood, predicted, and harnessed. Holography today brings together the fields of optics, chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering, visualization, three-dimensional display, and human perception in a unique and comprehensive way. As such, MAS.450 offers in

Subjects

holography | interference | diffraction | imaging of single points | three-dimensional images | "hands-on" approach | physical phenomena | holograms

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.03 Physics III: Vibrations and Waves (MIT)

Description

In addition to the traditional topics of mechanical vibrations and waves, coupled oscillators, and electro-magnetic radiation, students will also learn about musical instruments, red sunsets, glories, coronae, rainbows, haloes, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, black holes and big-bang cosmology. OpenCourseWare presents another version of 8.03 that features a full set of lecture notes and take-home experiments. Also by Walter Lewin Courses: Classical Mechanics (8.01)- with a complete set of 35 video lectures from the Fall of 1999 Electricity and Magnetism (8.02)- with a complete set of 36 video lectures from the Spring of 2002 Talks: For The Love Of Physics - Professor of Physics Emeritus Walter Lewin's last MIT lecture, complete with some of his most famous phy

Subjects

mechanical vibrations | waves | simple harmonic motion | superposition | forced vibrations | resonance | coupled oscillations | normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection | refraction | phase | group velocity | Optics | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | Snell's Law | interference | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings | musical instruments | red sunsets | glories | coronae | rainbows | haloes | X-ray binaries | neutron stars | black holes | big-bang cosmology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.03 Physics III (MIT)

Description

Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings.

Subjects

Mechanical vibrations and waves | simple harmonic motion | superposition | forced vibrations and resonance | coupled oscillations and normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection and refraction | phase and group velocity | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | Snell's Law | interference | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.450 Holographic Imaging (MIT)

Description

MAS.450 is a laboratory course about holography and holographic imaging. This course teaches holography from a scientific and analytical point of view, moving from interference and diffraction to imaging of single points to the display of three-dimensional images. Using a "hands-on" approach, students explore the underlying physical phenomena that make holograms work, as well as designing laboratory setups to make their own images. The course also teaches mathematical techniques that allow the behavior of holography to be understood, predicted, and harnessed. Holography today brings together the fields of optics, chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering, visualization, three-dimensional display, and human perception in a unique and comprehensive way. As such, MAS.450 offers in

Subjects

holography | interference | diffraction | imaging of single points | three-dimensional images | "hands-on" approach | physical phenomena | holograms

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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