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3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT) 3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

Subjects

investment casting of metals | investment casting of metals | injection molding of polymers | injection molding of polymers | sintering of ceramics | sintering of ceramics | operating processing equipment | operating processing equipment | materials engineering project management | materials engineering project management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT) 3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site. The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site.

Subjects

energetics | energetics | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | linear algebra | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | orthonormal basis | eigenvalues | eigenvalues | eigenvectors | eigenvectors | quadratic forms | quadratic forms | tensor operations | tensor operations | symmetry operations | symmetry operations | calculus | calculus | complex analysis | complex analysis | differential equations | differential equations | theory of distributions | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | fourier analysis | random walks | random walks | mathematical technicques | mathematical technicques | materials science | materials science | materials engineering | materials engineering | materials structure | materials structure | symmetry | symmetry | applied fields | applied fields | materials response | materials response | solids mechanics | solids mechanics | solids physics | solids physics | soft materials | soft materials | multi-variable calculus | multi-variable calculus | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | mathematical techniques | mathematical techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Biomaterials and Biomedical Materials: The Structure and Mechanical Behaviour of Wood

Description

This set of animations consists of interactive 3D models of Scots pine and greenheart wood, and 3 point bending test of wet balsa. From TLP: The Structure and Mechanical Behaviour of Wood

Subjects

wood | mechanical behavior | strength | stiffness | materials engineering | doitpoms | university of cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Internet for materials engineering

Description

Internet for materials engineering is a tutorial from the Virtual Training Suite. The Virtual Training Suite tutorials aim to help university and college students to develop Internet research skills to assist with their coursework and assignments. The tutorials were written by a national team of UK university or college lecturers and librarians. They recommend key websites in their subject and help students to make discerning use of the Internet to help find information for coursework, literature reviews or personal research. This is an archived version of the tutorial. As of the 1st of August 2011 any further development of the tutorials is being undertaken by TutorPro at http://www.vtstutorials.co.uk

Subjects

materials engineering | digital literacy | internet research skills | virtual training suite | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

Subjects

investment casting of metals | injection molding of polymers | sintering of ceramics | operating processing equipment | materials engineering project management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site.

Subjects

energetics | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | eigenvalues | eigenvectors | quadratic forms | tensor operations | symmetry operations | calculus | complex analysis | differential equations | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | random walks | mathematical technicques | materials science | materials engineering | materials structure | symmetry | applied fields | materials response | solids mechanics | solids physics | soft materials | multi-variable calculus | ordinary differential equations | partial differential equations | applied mathematics | mathematical techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | investment casting | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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