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5.13 Organic Chemistry II (MIT) 5.13 Organic Chemistry II (MIT)

Description

5.13 is an intermediate organic chemistry course that deals primarily with synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry are included to illustrate the role of organic chemistry in biological systems, medicine, and in the chemical industry. 5.13 is an intermediate organic chemistry course that deals primarily with synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity emphasized. Special topics in organic chemistry are included to illustrate the role of organic chemistry in biological systems, medicine, and in the chemical industry.

Subjects

intermediate organic chemistry | intermediate organic chemistry | organic | organic | organic molecules | organic molecules | stereochemistry | stereochemistry | reaction mechanisms | reaction mechanisms | synthesis of organic compounds | synthesis of organic compounds | synthesis | synthesis | structure determination | structure determination | mechanism | mechanism | structure | structure | reactivity | reactivity

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5.13 Organic Chemistry II (MIT) 5.13 Organic Chemistry II (MIT)

Description

This intermediate organic chemistry course focuses on the methods used to identify the structure of organic molecules, advanced principles of organic stereochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and methods used for the synthesis of organic compounds. Additional special topics include illustrating the role of organic chemistry in biology, medicine, and industry. This intermediate organic chemistry course focuses on the methods used to identify the structure of organic molecules, advanced principles of organic stereochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and methods used for the synthesis of organic compounds. Additional special topics include illustrating the role of organic chemistry in biology, medicine, and industry.

Subjects

intermediate organic chemistry | intermediate organic chemistry | organic molecules | organic molecules | stereochemistry | stereochemistry | reaction mechanisms | reaction mechanisms | synthesis of organic compounds | synthesis of organic compounds | synthesis | synthesis | structure determination | structure determination | mechanism | mechanism | reactivity | reactivity | functional groups | functional groups | NMR | NMR | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | spectrometry | spectrometry | structure elucidation | structure elucidation | infrared spectroscopy | infrared spectroscopy | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy | reactive intermediates | reactive intermediates | carbocations | carbocations | radicals | radicals | aromaticity | aromaticity | conjugated systems | conjugated systems | molecular orbital theory | molecular orbital theory | pericyclic reactions | pericyclic reactions

License

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14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT) 14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice. This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | mechanism design | mechanism design | auction theory | auction theory | one-sided matching | one-sided matching | house allocation | house allocation | market problems | market problems | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | stability | stability | many-to-one | many-to-one | one-to-one | one-to-one | small cores | small cores | large markets | large markets | stochastic matching mechanisms | stochastic matching mechanisms | student assignment | student assignment | school choice | school choice | resale markets | resale markets | dynamics | dynamics | simplicity | simplicity | robustness | robustness | limited rationality | limited rationality | message spaces | message spaces | sharing risk | sharing risk | decentralized exchanges | decentralized exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges

License

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

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Machine Theory Machine Theory

Description

The aim of this course is to pre-dimension a machine depending on the requirements and requests that will be submitted. Analysis of the kinematic and dynamic of machines and spatial mechanisms. Analysis of the behavior of rotation and / or translation elements. Modeling and simulation of machines (modeling methods and computer simulation). The aim of this course is to pre-dimension a machine depending on the requirements and requests that will be submitted. Analysis of the kinematic and dynamic of machines and spatial mechanisms. Analysis of the behavior of rotation and / or translation elements. Modeling and simulation of machines (modeling methods and computer simulation).

Subjects

Hyperbolic | Hyperbolic | Ingenieria Mecanica | Ingenieria Mecanica | Bevel gears | Bevel gears | Synthesis of mechanisms | Synthesis of mechanisms | Kinematics | Kinematics | Spur gears | Spur gears | Spatial Mechanisms | Spatial Mechanisms | Pro-Engineer | Pro-Engineer | Mechanisms | Mechanisms | Gear trains | Gear trains | Rolling Bearings selection | Rolling Bearings selection | Balancing | Balancing | 2012 | 2012 | Simulation | Simulation | Cams design | Cams design | Plain bearings design | Plain bearings design | Analytical mechanics applied to machinery | Analytical mechanics applied to machinery | a Mecnica | a Mecnica | Helical | Helical | Flywheels | Flywheels | Friction | Friction | Lubrication | Lubrication | Software simulation | Software simulation

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

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6.972 Game Theory and Mechanism Design (MIT) 6.972 Game Theory and Mechanism Design (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduates and is an introduction to fundamentals of game theory and mechanism design with motivations drawn from various applications including distributed control of wireline and wireless communication networks, incentive-compatible/dynamic resource allocation, and pricing. Emphasis is placed on the foundations of the theory, mathematical tools, as well as modeling and the equilibrium notions in different environments. Topics covered include: normal form games, learning in games, supermodular games, potential games, dynamic games, subgame perfect equilibrium, bargaining, repeated games, auctions, mechanism design, cooperative game theory, network and congestion games, and price of anarchy. This course is offered to graduates and is an introduction to fundamentals of game theory and mechanism design with motivations drawn from various applications including distributed control of wireline and wireless communication networks, incentive-compatible/dynamic resource allocation, and pricing. Emphasis is placed on the foundations of the theory, mathematical tools, as well as modeling and the equilibrium notions in different environments. Topics covered include: normal form games, learning in games, supermodular games, potential games, dynamic games, subgame perfect equilibrium, bargaining, repeated games, auctions, mechanism design, cooperative game theory, network and congestion games, and price of anarchy.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | mechanism design | mechanism design | mathematical tools | mathematical tools | normal form games | normal form games | existence and computation of equilibria | existence and computation of equilibria | supermodular games | supermodular games | potential games | potential games | subgame perfect equilibrium | subgame perfect equilibrium | dynamic games | dynamic games | bargaining | bargaining | repeated games | repeated games | games with incomplete/imperfect information | games with incomplete/imperfect information | auctions | auctions | cooperative game theory | cooperative game theory | network and congestion games | network and congestion games | pricing | pricing | price of anarchy | price of anarchy

License

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21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

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2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT) 2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT)

Description

This course provides an advanced treatment of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams, and mechanisms. Analysis of these elements includes extensive application of core engineering curriculum including solid mechanics and fluid dynamics. The course offers practice in skills needed for machine design such as estimation, drawing, and experimentation. Students work in small teams to design and build machines that address real-world challenges. This course provides an advanced treatment of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams, and mechanisms. Analysis of these elements includes extensive application of core engineering curriculum including solid mechanics and fluid dynamics. The course offers practice in skills needed for machine design such as estimation, drawing, and experimentation. Students work in small teams to design and build machines that address real-world challenges.

Subjects

machine design | machine design | hardware | hardware | project | project | machine element | machine element | design process | design process | design layout | design layout | prototype | prototype | mechanism | mechanism | engineering | engineering | fabrication | fabrication

License

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1.040 Project Management (MIT) 1.040 Project Management (MIT)

Description

As technological integration and construction complexity increase, so does construction lead times. To stay competitive companies have sought to shorten the construction times of new infrastructure by managing construction development efforts effectively by using different project management tools. In this course, three important aspects of construction project management are taught:The theory, methods and quantitative tools used to effectively plan, organize, and control construction projects;Efficient management methods revealed through practice and research;hands-on, practical project management knowledge from on-site situations.To achieve this, we will use a basic project management framework in which the project life-cycle is broken into organizing, planning, monitoring, controlling a As technological integration and construction complexity increase, so does construction lead times. To stay competitive companies have sought to shorten the construction times of new infrastructure by managing construction development efforts effectively by using different project management tools. In this course, three important aspects of construction project management are taught:The theory, methods and quantitative tools used to effectively plan, organize, and control construction projects;Efficient management methods revealed through practice and research;hands-on, practical project management knowledge from on-site situations.To achieve this, we will use a basic project management framework in which the project life-cycle is broken into organizing, planning, monitoring, controlling a

Subjects

project management | project management | quantitative tools | quantitative tools | management methods | management methods | project life cycle | project life cycle | feasibility and organization | feasibility and organization | project planning | project planning | project monitoring and control | project monitoring and control | project learning | project learning | system dynamics | system dynamics | software tools | software tools | resource constraints | resource constraints | contract mechanisms | contract mechanisms

License

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems (MIT) 2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems (MIT)

Description

This course deals with modeling multi-domain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Topics covered include network representation, state-space models; multi-port energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms, nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms and control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission. This course deals with modeling multi-domain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Topics covered include network representation, state-space models; multi-port energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms, nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms and control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission.

Subjects

Modeling multi-domain engineering systems | Modeling multi-domain engineering systems | design and control system implementation | design and control system implementation | Network representation | Network representation | state-space models | state-space models | dissipation | dissipation | Legendre transforms | Legendre transforms | Nonlinear mechanics | Nonlinear mechanics | transformation theory | transformation theory | Hamiltonian forms | Hamiltonian forms | Control-relevant properties | Control-relevant properties | electro-mechanical transducers | electro-mechanical transducers | mechanisms | mechanisms | electronics | electronics | thermal systems | thermal systems | compressible flow | compressible flow | chemical processes | chemical processes | diffusion | diffusion | wave transmission | wave transmission

License

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Design (MIT) Design (MIT)

Description

This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage, This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage,

Subjects

ships | ships | offshore structures | offshore structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | Hydrostatic loading | Hydrostatic loading | shear load | shear load | bending moment | bending moment | ship structural design concepts | ship structural design concepts | superstructures | superstructures | primary strength | primary strength | transverse shear stresses | transverse shear stresses | torsional strength | torsional strength | Failure mechanisms | Failure mechanisms | design limit states | design limit states | plastic analysis | plastic analysis | Matrix stiffness | Matrix stiffness | grillage | grillage | finite element analysis | finite element analysis | 2.082 | 2.082

License

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9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT) 9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT)

Description

This course will sample the broad diversity of animal behavior and the behavioral adaptation of animals to the environments in which they live. This will include discussion of both field observations and controlled laboratory experiments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison of behavior within an evolutionary framework, animal cognition, and on the genetic, neural, and hormonal mechanisms underlying behavior. This course will sample the broad diversity of animal behavior and the behavioral adaptation of animals to the environments in which they live. This will include discussion of both field observations and controlled laboratory experiments. Particular emphasis will be placed on the comparison of behavior within an evolutionary framework, animal cognition, and on the genetic, neural, and hormonal mechanisms underlying behavior.

Subjects

behavior | behavior | adaptation | adaptation | habits | habits | environment | environment | hormonal mechanisms | hormonal mechanisms | neural | neural | genetic | genetic | animal cognition | animal cognition | evolution | evolution | field observations | field observations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.12 Introduction to Robotics (MIT) 2.12 Introduction to Robotics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls. Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, 3D graphic simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, human-machine interface, and embedded software. Weekly laboratories provide experience with servo drives, real-time control, and embedded software. Students will design and fabricate working robotic systems in a group-based term project.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site. This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls. Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, 3D graphic simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, human-machine interface, and embedded software. Weekly laboratories provide experience with servo drives, real-time control, and embedded software. Students will design and fabricate working robotic systems in a group-based term project.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.

Subjects

robot | robot | robot design | robot design | dynamics | dynamics | statics | statics | intelligent control | intelligent control | planar and spatial kinematics | planar and spatial kinematics | motion planning | motion planning | manipulator | manipulator | mobile robots | mobile robots | multi-rigid-body dynamics | multi-rigid-body dynamics | 3D graphic simulation | 3D graphic simulation | control design | control design | actuator | actuator | sensor | sensor | task modeling | task modeling | human-machine interface | human-machine interface | embedded software | embedded software | servo | servo | servomechanism | servomechanism | real-time control | real-time control | computer vision | computer vision | navigation | navigation | tele-robotics | tele-robotics | virtual reality | virtual reality

License

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT) 17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling. This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | measurement | ethnic diversity | ethnic diversity | fluidity | fluidity | identity | identity | social identity theory | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | memory | death | death | stigma | stigma | prejudice | prejudice | contact hypothesis | contact hypothesis | cascade models | cascade models | identity simulation | identity simulation

License

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17.584 Civil-Military Relations (MIT) 17.584 Civil-Military Relations (MIT)

Description

This course centers on mechanisms of civilian control of the military. Relying on the influential texts of Lasswell, Huntington, and Finer, the first classes clarify the basic tensions between the military and civilians. A wide-ranging series of case studies follows. These cases are chosen to create a field of variation that includes states with stable civilian rule, states with stable military influence, and states exhibiting fluctuations between military and civilian control. The final three weeks of the course are devoted to the broader relationship between military and society. This course centers on mechanisms of civilian control of the military. Relying on the influential texts of Lasswell, Huntington, and Finer, the first classes clarify the basic tensions between the military and civilians. A wide-ranging series of case studies follows. These cases are chosen to create a field of variation that includes states with stable civilian rule, states with stable military influence, and states exhibiting fluctuations between military and civilian control. The final three weeks of the course are devoted to the broader relationship between military and society.

Subjects

Civil | Civil | Military | Military | relations | relations | mechanisms | mechanisms | civilian control | civilian control | Lasswell | Lasswell | Huntington | Huntington | Finer | Finer | case studies | case studies | states | states | civilian rule | civilian rule | society | society | United States | United States | Soviet Union | Soviet Union | Great Purge | Great Purge | Latin America | Latin America | Turkey | Turkey | Pakistan | Pakistan | Japan | Japan | Africa | Africa | Multiethnic States | Multiethnic States

License

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4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT) 4.163J Urban Design Studio: Providence (MIT)

Description

This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product. This studio discusses in great detail the design of urban environments, specifically in Providence, RI. It will propose strategies for change in large areas of cities, to be developed over time, involving different actors. Fitting forms into natural, man-made, historical, and cultural contexts; enabling desirable activity patterns; conceptualizing built form; providing infrastructure and service systems; guiding the sensory character of development: all are topics covered in the studio. The course integrates architecture and planning students in joint work and requires individual designs and planning guidelines as a final product.

Subjects

urban planning | urban planning | community | community | stakeholders | stakeholders | development | development | urban growth | urban growth | Providence | Providence | Rhode Island | Rhode Island | institutional mechanisms | institutional mechanisms | housing | housing | waterfront | waterfront | port | port | built form | built form | public space | public space | landscape | landscape | path and access systems | path and access systems | parking | parking | density | density | activity location and intensity | activity location and intensity | planning | planning | finance | finance | public/private partnerships | public/private partnerships | parcelization | parcelization | phasing | phasing | multi-disciplinary teams | multi-disciplinary teams | 4.163 | 4.163 | 11.332 | 11.332

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

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5.111 Principles of Chemical Science (MIT) 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules. The emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. In an effort to illuminate connections between chemistry and biology, a list of the biology-, medicine-, and MIT research-related examples used in 5.111 is provided in Biology-Related Examples. Acknowledgements Development and implementation of the biology-related materials in this course were funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Prof. Catherine L. Drennan. This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules. The emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. In an effort to illuminate connections between chemistry and biology, a list of the biology-, medicine-, and MIT research-related examples used in 5.111 is provided in Biology-Related Examples. Acknowledgements Development and implementation of the biology-related materials in this course were funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Prof. Catherine L. Drennan.

Subjects

introductory chemistry | introductory chemistry | atomic structure | atomic structure | molecular electronic structure | molecular electronic structure | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | acid-base equillibrium | acid-base equillibrium | titration | titration | redox | redox | chemical kinetics | chemical kinetics | catalysis | catalysis | lewis structures | lewis structures | VSEPR theory | VSEPR theory | wave-particle duality | wave-particle duality | biochemistry | biochemistry | orbitals | orbitals | periodic trends | periodic trends | general chemistry | general chemistry | valence bond theory | valence bond theory | hybridization | hybridization | free energy | free energy | reaction mechanism | reaction mechanism | Rutherford backscattering | Rutherford backscattering

License

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1.105 Solid Mechanics Laboratory (MIT) 1.105 Solid Mechanics Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to basic properties of structural materials and behavior of simple structural elements and systems through a series of experiments. Students learn experimental technique, data collection, reduction and analysis, and presentation of results. Students generally take this subject during the same semester as 1.050, Solid Mechanics. This course introduces students to basic properties of structural materials and behavior of simple structural elements and systems through a series of experiments. Students learn experimental technique, data collection, reduction and analysis, and presentation of results. Students generally take this subject during the same semester as 1.050, Solid Mechanics.

Subjects

properties of structural materials | properties of structural materials | structural elements | structural elements | structural systems | structural systems | experimental technique | experimental technique | data collection | data collection | reduction | reduction | analysis | analysis | presentation | presentation | properties | properties | structural materials | structural materials | structural behavior | structural behavior | simple structural elements | simple structural elements | simple structural systems | simple structural systems | laboratory experiments | laboratory experiments | data reduction | data reduction | data analysis | data analysis | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | loading | loading | observation | observation | measurement | measurement | force | force | displacement | displacement | stiffness | stiffness | failure modes | failure modes | failure mechanisms | failure mechanisms | instrumentation | instrumentation | resolution | resolution | range | range | transducer response | transducer response | signal conditioning | signal conditioning | experimental design | experimental design | report writing | report writing

License

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2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT) 2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced course on modeling, design, integration and best practices for use of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams and mechanisms. Modeling and analysis of these elements is based upon extensive application of physics, mathematics and core mechanical engineering principles (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, manufacturing, estimation, computer simulation, etc.). These principles are reinforced via (1) hands-on laboratory experiences wherein students conduct experiments and disassemble machines and (2) a substantial design project wherein students model, design, fabricate and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real world application. Students master the materials via problems sets that are directly related to, and coordinated with, the deliv This is an advanced course on modeling, design, integration and best practices for use of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams and mechanisms. Modeling and analysis of these elements is based upon extensive application of physics, mathematics and core mechanical engineering principles (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, manufacturing, estimation, computer simulation, etc.). These principles are reinforced via (1) hands-on laboratory experiences wherein students conduct experiments and disassemble machines and (2) a substantial design project wherein students model, design, fabricate and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real world application. Students master the materials via problems sets that are directly related to, and coordinated with, the deliv

Subjects

biology | biology | chemistry | chemistry | synthetic biology | synthetic biology | project | project | biotech | biotech | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | GMO | GMO | ethics | ethics | biomedical ethics | biomedical ethics | genetics | genetics | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | DNA | DNA | gene sequencing | gene sequencing | gene synthesis | gene synthesis | biohacking | biohacking | computational biology | computational biology | iGEM | iGEM | BioBrick | BioBrick | systems biology | systems biology | machine design | machine design | hardware | hardware | machine element | machine element | design process | design process | design layout | design layout | prototype | prototype | mechanism | mechanism | engineering | engineering | fabrication | fabrication | lathe | lathe | precision engineering | precision engineering | group project | group project | project management | project management | CAD | CAD | fatigue | fatigue | Gantt chart | Gantt chart

License

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2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems (MIT) 2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems (MIT)

Description

This course models multi-domain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Topics include network representation, state-space models; multi-port energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms; nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms; and control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission. This course models multi-domain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Topics include network representation, state-space models; multi-port energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms; nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms; and control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission.

Subjects

Modeling multi-domain engineering systems | Modeling multi-domain engineering systems | design and control system implementation | design and control system implementation | Network representation | Network representation | state-space models | state-space models | dissipation | dissipation | Legendre transforms | Legendre transforms | Nonlinear mechanics | Nonlinear mechanics | transformation theory | transformation theory | Hamiltonian forms | Hamiltonian forms | Control-relevant properties | Control-relevant properties | electro-mechanical transducers | electro-mechanical transducers | mechanisms | mechanisms | electronics | electronics | thermal systems | thermal systems | compressible flow | compressible flow | chemical processes | chemical processes | diffusion | diffusion | wave transmission | wave transmission

License

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2.12 Introduction to Robotics (MIT) 2.12 Introduction to Robotics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls. Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, 3D graphic simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, human-machine interface, and embedded software. Weekly laboratories provide experience with servo drives, real-time control, and embedded software. Students will design and fabricate working robotic systems in a group-based term project. This course provides an overview of robot mechanisms, dynamics, and intelligent controls. Topics include planar and spatial kinematics, and motion planning; mechanism design for manipulators and mobile robots, multi-rigid-body dynamics, 3D graphic simulation; control design, actuators, and sensors; wireless networking, task modeling, human-machine interface, and embedded software. Weekly laboratories provide experience with servo drives, real-time control, and embedded software. Students will design and fabricate working robotic systems in a group-based term project.

Subjects

robot | robot | robot design | robot design | rescue | rescue | recovery | recovery | automation | automation | dynamics | dynamics | statics | statics | intelligent control | intelligent control | planar and spatial kinematics | planar and spatial kinematics | motion planning | motion planning | manipulator | manipulator | mobile robots | mobile robots | multi-rigid-body dynamics | multi-rigid-body dynamics | 3D graphic simulation | 3D graphic simulation | control design | control design | actuator | actuator | sensor | sensor | task modeling | task modeling | human-machine interface | human-machine interface | embedded software | embedded software | servo | servo | servomechanism | servomechanism | real-time control | real-time control | computer vision | computer vision | navigation | navigation | tele-robotics | tele-robotics | virtual reality | virtual reality

License

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Design (13.122) (MIT) Design (13.122) (MIT)

Description

This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage, This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage,

Subjects

ships | ships | offshore structures | offshore structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | Hydrostatic loading | Hydrostatic loading | shear load | shear load | bending moment | bending moment | ship structural design concepts | ship structural design concepts | superstructures | superstructures | primary strength | primary strength | transverse shear stresses | transverse shear stresses | torsional strength | torsional strength | Failure mechanisms | Failure mechanisms | design limit states | design limit states | plastic analysis | plastic analysis | Matrix stiffness | Matrix stiffness | grillage | grillage | finite element analysis | finite element analysis

License

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