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2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT) 2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

This course provides parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology. This course provides parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.

Subjects

nanotechnology | nanotechnology | nanoscale | nanoscale | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | photons | photons | electrons | electrons | phonons | phonons | energy carriers | energy carriers | energy transport | energy transport | heat transport | heat transport | energy levels | energy levels | statistical behavior | statistical behavior | internal energy | internal energy | waves and particles | waves and particles | scattering | scattering | heat generation | heat generation | Boltzmann equation | Boltzmann equation | classical laws | classical laws | microtechnology | microtechnology | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | quantum oscillator | quantum oscillator | laudaurer | laudaurer | nanotube | nanotube | Louiville equation | Louiville equation | X-ray | X-ray | blackbody | blackbody | quantum well | quantum well | Fourier | Fourier | Newton | Newton | Ohm | Ohm | thermoelectric effect | thermoelectric effect | Brownian motion | Brownian motion | surface tension | surface tension | van der Waals potential. | van der Waals potential. | van der Waals potential | van der Waals potential

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT) 3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc

Subjects

biology | biology | biological engineering | biological engineering | cells | cells | AFM | AFM | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope | nanoindentation | nanoindentation | gecko | gecko | malaria | malaria | nanotube | nanotube | collagen | collagen | polymer | polymer | seashell | seashell | biomimetics | biomimetics | molecule | molecule | atomic | atomic | bonding | bonding | adhesion | adhesion | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | protein | protein | DNA | DNA | bone | bone | lipid | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.320 Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials (SMA 5107) (MIT) 3.320 Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials (SMA 5107) (MIT)

Description

This course uses the theory and application of atomistic computer simulations to model, understand, and predict the properties of real materials. Specific topics include: energy models from classical potentials to first-principles approaches; density functional theory and the total-energy pseudopotential method; errors and accuracy of quantitative predictions: thermodynamic ensembles, Monte Carlo sampling and molecular dynamics simulations; free energy and phase transitions; fluctuations and transport properties; and coarse-graining approaches and mesoscale models. The course employs case studies from industrial applications of advanced materials to nanotechnology. Several laboratories will give students direct experience with simulations of classical force fields, electronic-structure app This course uses the theory and application of atomistic computer simulations to model, understand, and predict the properties of real materials. Specific topics include: energy models from classical potentials to first-principles approaches; density functional theory and the total-energy pseudopotential method; errors and accuracy of quantitative predictions: thermodynamic ensembles, Monte Carlo sampling and molecular dynamics simulations; free energy and phase transitions; fluctuations and transport properties; and coarse-graining approaches and mesoscale models. The course employs case studies from industrial applications of advanced materials to nanotechnology. Several laboratories will give students direct experience with simulations of classical force fields, electronic-structure app

Subjects

simulation | simulation | computer simulation | computer simulation | atomistic computer simulations | atomistic computer simulations | Density-functional theory | Density-functional theory | DFT | DFT | Hartree-Fock | Hartree-Fock | total-energy pseudopotential | total-energy pseudopotential | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | thermodynamic ensembles | thermodynamic ensembles | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | first-principles | first-principles | Monte Carlo sampling | Monte Carlo sampling | molecular dynamics | molecular dynamics | finite temperature | finite temperature | Free energies | Free energies | phase transitions | phase transitions | Coarse-graining | Coarse-graining | mesoscale model | mesoscale model | nanotube | nanotube | alloy | alloy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT) 2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT)

Description

Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials

Subjects

scale | scale | complexity | complexity | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | kinematics | kinematics | metrology | metrology | engineering modeling | motion | engineering modeling | motion | modeling | modeling | design | design | manufacture | manufacture | design principles | design principles | fabrication process | fabrication process | functional requirements | functional requirements | precision instruments | precision instruments | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constaint-based design | constaint-based design | carbon nanotube | carbon nanotube | nanowire | nanowire | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | flexure | flexure | protein structure | protein structure | polymer structure | polymer structure | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | TMA pixel array | TMA pixel array | error modeling | error modeling | repeatability | repeatability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications. Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | mechanical behavior | material structure | material structure | deformation | deformation | failure | failure | elasticity | elasticity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fracture | fracture | fatigue | fatigue | metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | thin films | thin films | carbon nanotubes | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | battery materials | superelastic alloys | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | defect nucleation | student projects | student projects | viral capsides | viral capsides

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ordered film of carbon nanotubes

Description

It is necessary to form a stable dispersion of nanotubes in order to properly integrate them into polymeric systems. This can be achieved by treating them with acid to oxidise the tube surfaces. The tubes will then spontaneously disperse in an aqueous medium. The viscosity of these suspensions is analogous to that of polymers; it increases gradually with concentration up to a critical point (at about 0.7vol%) where entanglement occurs. A solid nanotube film has been formed by filtering the suspension through a 0.2mm membrane filter. Suspensions of relatively high concentration (>0.3vol%) yield films with random tube orientations but at lower concentrations (as in this sample), liquid crystal aggregation occurs and there is noticeable mutual alignment. The films exhibiting such alignme

Subjects

alignment | carbon | carbon nanotube | dispersion | film | nanotube | order | polymer | suspension | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Multi-walled carbon nanotube

Description

A variety of techniques may be used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes. These include electrolysis of molten salts with a graphite cathode, chemical vapour deposition, and striking graphite with an electric arc. This multi-walled tube was produced by the catalytic cracking of a hydrocarbon gas. The graphitic planes are clearly visible and a thin layer of amorphous carbon can be seen on the outer surface of the tube.

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | nanotube | polymer | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Carbon nanotubes

Description

It is necessary to form a stable dispersion of nanotubes in order to properly integrate them into polymeric systems. This can be achieved by treating them with acid to oxidise the tube surfaces. The tubes will then spontaneously disperse in an aqueous medium. The viscosity of these suspensions is analogous to that of polymers; it increases gradually with concentration up to a critical point (at about 0.7 vol%) where entanglement occurs. However, their separation is determined more by surface repulsions than by entropy arising from chain flexibility. Their stiffness suggests that parallel clusters might be a natural state for aggregation but it also means that any deviations form straightness of the tubes (due to defects) will compromise significant tube parallelism. This image was t

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | dispersion | film | nanotube | order | polymer | suspension | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Aligned array of nanotubes

Description

Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) allows the synthesis of high purity nanotubes of controlled length and diameter. The nanotubes in this specimen were deposited on quartz using ferrocene dissolved in toluene. They are approximately 40 nm in diameter and 60 microns long.

Subjects

alignment | array | carbon | carbon nanotube | chemical vapour deposition (CVD) | ferrocene | film | nanotube | order | polymer | quartz | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

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Vapour-grown carbon nanotubes

Description

Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) allows the synthesis of high purity nanotubes of controlled length and diameter. The nanotubes in this specimen were formed in the heated zone of the apparatus whilst using ferrocene dissolved in toluene. The fibres are of high purity and their diameters range from 400 to 500 nm.

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | chemical vapour deposition (CVD) | ferrocene | nanotube | polymer | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Aligned carbon nanotubes, coated with a conducting polymer

Description

Carbon nanotubes are a long, tubular form of carbon that has an extremely high surface area. Conducting polymers, as their name suggests, are a group of polymers that exhibit excellent electrical conductivity, in some cases reaching that of copper.

Subjects

alignment | carbon | carbon nanotube | coating | conducting polymer | nanotube | polymer | polypyrrole | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Carbon nanotubes, coated with a conducting polymer

Description

Carbon nanotubes are a long, tubular form of carbon that has an extremely high surface area. Conducting polymers, as their name suggests, are a group of polymers that exhibit excellent electrical conductivity, in some cases reaching that of copper.

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | coating | conducting polymer | nanotube | polymer | polypyrrole | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Ordered film of carbon nanotubes

Description

0.3vol%) yield films with random tube orientations but at lower concentrations (as in this sample), liquid crystal aggregation occurs and there is noticeable mutual alignment. The films exhibiting such alignment are tougher. This image was taken using a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM).

Subjects

alignment | carbon | carbon nanotube | dispersion | film | nanotube | order | polymer | suspension | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Multi-walled carbon nanotube

Description

A variety of techniques may be used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes. These include electrolysis of molten salts with a graphite cathode, chemical vapour deposition, and striking graphite with an electric arc. This multi-walled tube was produced by the catalytic cracking of a hydrocarbon gas. The graphitic planes are clearly visible and a thin layer of amorphous carbon can be seen on the outer surface of the tube.

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | nanotube | polymer | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon nanotubes

Description

It is necessary to form a stable dispersion of nanotubes in order to properly integrate them into polymeric systems. This can be achieved by treating them with acid to oxidise the tube surfaces. The tubes will then spontaneously disperse in an aqueous medium. The viscosity of these suspensions is analogous to that of polymers; it increases gradually with concentration up to a critical point (at about 0.7 vol%) where entanglement occurs. However, their separation is determined more by surface repulsions than by entropy arising from chain flexibility. Their stiffness suggests that parallel clusters might be a natural state for aggregation but it also means that any deviations form straightness of the tubes (due to defects) will compromise significant tube parallelism. This image was taken us

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | dispersion | film | nanotube | order | polymer | suspension | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Aligned array of nanotubes

Description

Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) allows the synthesis of high purity nanotubes of controlled length and diameter. The nanotubes in this specimen were deposited on quartz using ferrocene dissolved in toluene. They are approximately 40 nm in diameter and 60 microns long.

Subjects

alignment | array | carbon | carbon nanotube | chemical vapour deposition (cvd) | ferrocene | film | nanotube | order | polymer | quartz | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Vapour-grown carbon nanotubes

Description

Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) allows the synthesis of high purity nanotubes of controlled length and diameter. The nanotubes in this specimen were formed in the heated zone of the apparatus whilst using ferrocene dissolved in toluene. The fibres are of high purity and their diameters range from 400 to 500 nm.

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | chemical vapour deposition (cvd) | ferrocene | nanotube | polymer | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Aligned carbon nanotubes, coated with a conducting polymer

Description

Carbon nanotubes are a long, tubular form of carbon that has an extremely high surface area. Conducting polymers, as their name suggests, are a group of polymers that exhibit excellent electrical conductivity, in some cases reaching that of copper.

Subjects

alignment | carbon | carbon nanotube | coating | conducting polymer | nanotube | polymer | polypyrrole | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Carbon nanotubes, coated with a conducting polymer

Description

Carbon nanotubes are a long, tubular form of carbon that has an extremely high surface area. Conducting polymers, as their name suggests, are a group of polymers that exhibit excellent electrical conductivity, in some cases reaching that of copper.

Subjects

carbon | carbon nanotube | coating | conducting polymer | nanotube | polymer | polypyrrole | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

This course provides parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.

Subjects

nanotechnology | nanoscale | transport phenomena | photons | electrons | phonons | energy carriers | energy transport | heat transport | energy levels | statistical behavior | internal energy | waves and particles | scattering | heat generation | Boltzmann equation | classical laws | microtechnology | crystal | lattice | quantum oscillator | laudaurer | nanotube | Louiville equation | X-ray | blackbody | quantum well | Fourier | Newton | Ohm | thermoelectric effect | Brownian motion | surface tension | van der Waals potential. | van der Waals potential

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT)

Description

Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials

Subjects

scale | complexity | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | kinematics | metrology | engineering modeling | motion | modeling | design | manufacture | design principles | fabrication process | functional requirements | precision instruments | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constaint-based design | carbon nanotube | nanowire | scanning tunneling microscope | flexure | protein structure | polymer structure | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | TMA pixel array | error modeling | repeatability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | material structure | deformation | failure | elasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | creep | fracture | fatigue | metals | semiconductors | ceramics | polymers | microstructure | composition | semiconductor diodes | thin films | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | student projects | viral capsides

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, the study of forces and motion on extremely tiny (10-9 m) areas of synthetic and biological materials and structures. At this level, mechanical properties are intimately related to chemistry, physics, and quantum mechanics. Most lectures will consist of a theoretical component that will then be compared to recent experimental data (case studies) in the literature. The course begins with a series of introductory lectures that describes the normal and lateral forces acting at the atomic scale. The following discussions include experimental techniques in high resolution force spectroscopy, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microsc

Subjects

biology | biological engineering | cells | AFM | atomic force microscope | nanoindentation | gecko | malaria | nanotube | collagen | polymer | seashell | biomimetics | molecule | atomic | bonding | adhesion | quantum mechanics | physics | chemistry | protein | DNA | bone | lipid

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.320 Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials (SMA 5107) (MIT)

Description

This course uses the theory and application of atomistic computer simulations to model, understand, and predict the properties of real materials. Specific topics include: energy models from classical potentials to first-principles approaches; density functional theory and the total-energy pseudopotential method; errors and accuracy of quantitative predictions: thermodynamic ensembles, Monte Carlo sampling and molecular dynamics simulations; free energy and phase transitions; fluctuations and transport properties; and coarse-graining approaches and mesoscale models. The course employs case studies from industrial applications of advanced materials to nanotechnology. Several laboratories will give students direct experience with simulations of classical force fields, electronic-structure app

Subjects

simulation | computer simulation | atomistic computer simulations | Density-functional theory | DFT | Hartree-Fock | total-energy pseudopotential | thermodynamics | thermodynamic ensembles | quantum mechanics | first-principles | Monte Carlo sampling | molecular dynamics | finite temperature | Free energies | phase transitions | Coarse-graining | mesoscale model | nanotube | alloy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.674 Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course encourages creative thinking through hands-on experience via building, observing and manipulating micro-and nano-scale structures. Students learn about underlying science and engineering principles and possible applications.

Subjects

microfluidics | surface science | self-assembly | MEMS | carbon nanotube and graphene | SEM | AFM | micro 3D printing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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