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RSC Wednesday Seminars 2011: Transnationalism: a fourth durable solution?

Description

Recorded at the Refugee Studies Centre's third Wednesday Public Seminar of Trinity Term 2011, on Wednesday 1st June 2011 at the Department of International Development, University of Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

transnationalism | refugee | forced migration | durable solutions | migration | transnationalism | refugee | forced migration | durable solutions | migration

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Buganda Nationalism in the 21st Century

Description

Dr Florence Brisset-Foucault, Research Associate, Cambridge, gives a talk for the African Studies Centre seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | nationalism | Africa | buganda | politics | nationalism | Africa | buganda | 2012-03-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Celebrating Gavin Williams: The politics of oil and identity in Nigeria: A political economy of ethnic nationalism

Description

Kathryn Nwajiaku, Oxford, gives a talk on The politics of Oil and Ethnic Nationalism in Nigeria's Niger Delta as part of the Nigeria Economy and Society section of the Celebrating Gavin Williams Conference. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

oil | Africa | gavin williams | politics | Nigeria | nationalism | niger | oil | Africa | gavin williams | politics | Nigeria | nationalism | niger | 2010-07-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | language | language | sexuality | sexuality | feminist analysis | feminist analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT) 17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | social science | institutions | institutions | ideology | ideology | policymaking | policymaking | state-building | state-building | democracy | democracy | regime change | regime change | conflict | conflict | war | war | political process | political process | nationalism | nationalism | terrorism | terrorism | social movment | social movment | modernization | modernization | secularization | secularization | church-state | church-state

License

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17.524 Nationalism (MIT) 17.524 Nationalism (MIT)

Description

This course provides a broad overview of the theories of and approaches to the study of nationalist thought and practice. It also explores the related phenomena termed nationalism: national consciousness and identity, nations, nation-states, and nationalist ideologies and nationalist movements. The course analyzes nationalism's emergence and endurance as a factor in modern politics and society. Topics include: nationalism and state-building, nationalism and economic modernization, nationalism and democratization, and nationalism and religious conflict. This course provides a broad overview of the theories of and approaches to the study of nationalist thought and practice. It also explores the related phenomena termed nationalism: national consciousness and identity, nations, nation-states, and nationalist ideologies and nationalist movements. The course analyzes nationalism's emergence and endurance as a factor in modern politics and society. Topics include: nationalism and state-building, nationalism and economic modernization, nationalism and democratization, and nationalism and religious conflict.

Subjects

nationalist thought | nationalist thought | nationalist practice | nationalist practice | nationalism | nationalism | political science | political science | national consciousness | national consciousness | identity | identity | nations | nations | nation-states | nation-states | nationalist ideologies | nationalist ideologies | nationalist movements | nationalist movements | modern politics | modern politics | state-building | state-building | economic modernization | economic modernization | democratization | democratization | religious conflict | religious conflict

License

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17.436 Territorial Conflict (MIT) 17.436 Territorial Conflict (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar introduces an emerging research program within International Relations on territorial conflict. While scholars have recognized that territory has been one of the most frequent issues over which states go to war, territorial conflicts have only recently become the subject of systematic study. This course will examine why territorial conflicts arise in the first place, why some of these conflicts escalate to high levels of violence and why other territorial disputes reach settlement, thereby reducing the likelihood of war. Readings in the course draw upon political geography and history as well as qualitative and quantitative approaches to political science. This graduate seminar introduces an emerging research program within International Relations on territorial conflict. While scholars have recognized that territory has been one of the most frequent issues over which states go to war, territorial conflicts have only recently become the subject of systematic study. This course will examine why territorial conflicts arise in the first place, why some of these conflicts escalate to high levels of violence and why other territorial disputes reach settlement, thereby reducing the likelihood of war. Readings in the course draw upon political geography and history as well as qualitative and quantitative approaches to political science.

Subjects

International Relations | International Relations | territorial conflict | territorial conflict | states | states | war | war | violence | violence | political geography | political geography | history | history | qualitative | qualitative | quantitative | quantitative | methods | methods | political science | political science | nationalism | nationalism | homelands | homelands | revisionism | revisionism | expansion | expansion | Empirics | Empirics | Boundary Management | Boundary Management | Diversion | Diversion | Domestic Mobilization | Domestic Mobilization | Anarchy | Anarchy | Power. | Power.

License

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17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT) 17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT)

Description

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra

Subjects

Strategy | Strategy | grand | grand | comparative | comparative | United States | United States | Great Britian | Great Britian | France | France | Germany | Germany | Russia | Russia | Europe | Europe | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | political | political | military | military | security | security | doctrine | doctrine | organizations | organizations | nationalism | nationalism | international | international | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | land warfare | land warfare | methods | methods | history | history | case study | case study

License

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4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT) 4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT)

Description

This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present." This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present."

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy | works | works | polemics | polemics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.645 Selected Topics in Architecture: Architecture from 1750 to the Present (MIT) 4.645 Selected Topics in Architecture: Architecture from 1750 to the Present (MIT)

Description

This class is a general study of modern architecture as a response to important technological, cultural, environmental, aesthetic, and theoretical challenges after the European Enlightenment. It focuses on the theoretical, historiographic, and design approaches to architectural problems encountered in the age of industrial and post-industrial expansion across the globe, with specific attention to the dominance of European modernism in setting the agenda for the discourse of a global modernity at large. It explores modern architectural history through thematic exposition rather than as a simple chronological succession of ideas. This class is a general study of modern architecture as a response to important technological, cultural, environmental, aesthetic, and theoretical challenges after the European Enlightenment. It focuses on the theoretical, historiographic, and design approaches to architectural problems encountered in the age of industrial and post-industrial expansion across the globe, with specific attention to the dominance of European modernism in setting the agenda for the discourse of a global modernity at large. It explores modern architectural history through thematic exposition rather than as a simple chronological succession of ideas.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy

License

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | race | race | oppression | oppression | social structures | social structures | transnationalism | transnationalism | globalization | globalization | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.470J Gender and Representation of Asian Women (MIT) 21A.470J Gender and Representation of Asian Women (MIT)

Description

This course explores stereotypes associated with Asian women in colonial, nationalist, state-authoritarian, and global/diasporic narratives about gender and power. Students will read ethnography, cultural studies, and history, and view films to examine the politics and circumstances that create and perpetuate the representation of Asian women as dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, despotic tyrants, desexualized servants, and docile subordinates. Students are introduced to the debates about Orientalism, gender, and power. This course explores stereotypes associated with Asian women in colonial, nationalist, state-authoritarian, and global/diasporic narratives about gender and power. Students will read ethnography, cultural studies, and history, and view films to examine the politics and circumstances that create and perpetuate the representation of Asian women as dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, despotic tyrants, desexualized servants, and docile subordinates. Students are introduced to the debates about Orientalism, gender, and power.

Subjects

21A.470 | 21A.470 | WGS.274 | WGS.274 | gender | gender | representation | representation | asian | asian | women | women | stereotypes | stereotypes | colonialism | colonialism | nationalism | nationalism | diaspora | diaspora | power | power

License

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21A.231J Gender, Sexuality, and Society (MIT) 21A.231J Gender, Sexuality, and Society (MIT)

Description

This course seeks to examine how people experience gender - what it means to be a man or a woman - and sexuality in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. We will explore how gender and sexuality relate to other categories of social identity and difference, such as race and ethnicity, economic and social standing, urban or rural life, etc. One goal of the class is to learn how to critically assess media and other popular representations of gender roles and stereotypes. Another is to gain a greater sense of the diversity of human social practices and beliefs in the United States and around the world. This course seeks to examine how people experience gender - what it means to be a man or a woman - and sexuality in a variety of historical and cultural contexts. We will explore how gender and sexuality relate to other categories of social identity and difference, such as race and ethnicity, economic and social standing, urban or rural life, etc. One goal of the class is to learn how to critically assess media and other popular representations of gender roles and stereotypes. Another is to gain a greater sense of the diversity of human social practices and beliefs in the United States and around the world.

Subjects

21A.231 | 21A.231 | WGS.455 | WGS.455 | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | marriage | marriage | nationalism | nationalism | race | race | class | class | sex | sex | globalization | globalization | professionalization | professionalization | agency | agency | appetite | appetite | identity | identity | transvestite | transvestite | transgender | transgender | intersexuality | intersexuality | motherhood | motherhood | fetus | fetus | sexism | sexism | SP.455J | SP.455J | SP.455 | SP.455

License

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

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STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT) STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT)

Description

This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime. This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime.

Subjects

modern japan | modern japan | transformation of japan | transformation of japan | nationalism | nationalism | japanese culture | japanese culture | postwar japan | postwar japan | anime | anime | japanese media | japanese media | japanese history | japanese history | modernization | modernization | cultural ideology | cultural ideology | Godzilla | Godzilla | technology transfer | technology transfer | shinkansen | shinkansen

License

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4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT) 4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT)

Description

This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present." This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present."

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy | works | works | polemics | polemics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Political Perspectives to State Censorship of Literature

Description

Peter McDonald and David Robertson discuss the idea of state censorship, especially Apartheid era South Africa, looking at the political perspectives and implications of state censorship of literature. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | south africa | apartheid | free speech | racism | liberty | #greatwriters | censorship | politics | nationalism | literature | south africa | apartheid | free speech | racism | liberty | #greatwriters | censorship | politics | nationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Literature and State Censorship: A literary perspective

Description

Peter McDonald and Elleke Bohemer discuss state censorship from a literary perspective; also discussing the issues of nationalism, modernism and Apartheid. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | south africa | apartheid | racism | modernism | #greatwriters | censorship | nationalism | literature | south africa | apartheid | racism | modernism | #greatwriters | censorship | nationalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Political Perspectives to State Censorship of Literature

Description

Peter McDonald and David Robertson discuss the idea of state censorship, especially Apartheid era South Africa, looking at the political perspectives and implications of state censorship of literature.

Subjects

literature | south africa | apartheid | free speech | racism | liberty | #greatwriters | censorship | politics | nationalism | literature | south africa | apartheid | free speech | racism | liberty | #greatwriters | censorship | politics | nationalism

License

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Literature and State Censorship: A literary perspective

Description

Peter McDonald and Elleke Bohemer discuss state censorship from a literary perspective; also discussing the issues of nationalism, modernism and Apartheid.

Subjects

literature | south africa | apartheid | racism | modernism | #greatwriters | censorship | nationalism | literature | south africa | apartheid | racism | modernism | #greatwriters | censorship | nationalism

License

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Why study church history? Why study church history?

Description

Two eminent modern church historians, Prof. Alan Ford and Dr Frances Knight, discuss the nature of their discipline exploring how it sits between the aims of historians and theologians: belonging to both disciplines, it has a distinctive task and voice. Two eminent modern church historians, Prof. Alan Ford and Dr Frances Knight, discuss the nature of their discipline exploring how it sits between the aims of historians and theologians: belonging to both disciplines, it has a distinctive task and voice.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | history | history | religious | religious | church | church | sectarianism | sectarianism | nationalism | nationalism | hatred | hatred | identity | identity | ecumenism | ecumenism | Irish | Irish

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.408 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT) 17.408 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the international system since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations. This course explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the international system since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations.

Subjects

Chinese foreign policy | Chinese foreign policy | international relations | international relations | Korean War | Korean War | ideology | ideology | Yalu | Yalu | Mao | Mao | Nehru | Nehru | bipolarity | bipolarity | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | territorial sovereignty | territorial sovereignty | strategic weapons | strategic weapons | nationalism | nationalism | security | security | economic policies | economic policies | World Trade Organization | World Trade Organization | economic integration | economic integration | social state | social state | multilateralism | multilateralism | regional security | regional security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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