Searching for neurophysiology : 29 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT) 9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sensory systems | sleep | sleep | dreaming | dreaming | motivation | motivation | reward | reward | emotional displays | emotional displays | higher functions | higher functions | neocortex | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | neural processes in learning and memory | Neurobehavior | Neurobehavior

License

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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT) 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory. This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory.

Subjects

neuroscience | neuroscience | vision | vision | hearing | hearing | neuroanatomy | neuroanatomy | color vision | color vision | blind spot | blind spot | retinal phototransduction | retinal phototransduction | center-surround receptive fields | center-surround receptive fields | corticalmaps | corticalmaps | primary visual cortex | primary visual cortex | simple cells | simple cells | complex cells | complex cells | extrastriate cortex | extrastriate cortex | ear | ear | cochlea | cochlea | basilar membrane | basilar membrane | auditory transduction | auditory transduction | hair cells | hair cells | phase-locking | phase-locking | tonotopy | tonotopy | sound localization | sound localization | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | somatosensory system | somatosensory system | motor system | motor system | synaptic transmission | synaptic transmission | action potential | action potential | sympathetic neurons | sympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | cellual neurophysiology | cellual neurophysiology | learning | learning | memory | memory

License

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24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT) 24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation? This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | psychology | psychology | philosophy | philosophy | Turing Machines | Turing Machines | consciousness | consciousness | computer limitations | computer limitations | computation | computation | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | Turing test | Turing test | the analog/digital distinction | the analog/digital distinction | Chinese Room argument | Chinese Room argument | causal efficacy of content | causal efficacy of content | inverted spectrum | inverted spectrum | mental representation | mental representation | procedural semantics | procedural semantics | connectionism | connectionism

License

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24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT) 24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in the philosophy of mind, with an emphasis on consciousness and the mind-body problem. This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in the philosophy of mind, with an emphasis on consciousness and the mind-body problem.

Subjects

artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | psychology | psychology | philosophy | philosophy | turning machines | turning machines | consciousness | consciousness | computer limitations | computer limitations | computations | computations | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | Turing test | Turing test | the analog/digital distinction | the analog/digital distinction | Chinese Room argument | Chinese Room argument | causal efficacy of content | causal efficacy of content | inverted spectrum | inverted spectrum | mental representation | mental representation | procedural semantics | procedural semantics | connectionism | connectionism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT) 9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers the relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers the relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory.

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sensory systems | sleep | sleep | dreaming | dreaming | motivation | motivation | reward | reward | emotional displays | emotional displays | higher functions | higher functions | neocortex | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | neural processes in learning and memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.349 From Molecules to Behavior: Synaptic Neurophysiology (MIT) 7.349 From Molecules to Behavior: Synaptic Neurophysiology (MIT)

Description

Like transistors in a computer, synapses perform complex computations and connect the brain's non-linear processing elements (neurons) into a functional circuit. Understanding the role of synapses in neuronal computation is essential to understanding how the brain works. In this course students will be introduced to cutting-edge research in the field of synaptic neurophysiology. The course will cover such topics as synapse formation, synaptic function, synaptic plasticity, the roles of synapses in higher cognitive processes and how synaptic dysfunction can lead to disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn ab Like transistors in a computer, synapses perform complex computations and connect the brain's non-linear processing elements (neurons) into a functional circuit. Understanding the role of synapses in neuronal computation is essential to understanding how the brain works. In this course students will be introduced to cutting-edge research in the field of synaptic neurophysiology. The course will cover such topics as synapse formation, synaptic function, synaptic plasticity, the roles of synapses in higher cognitive processes and how synaptic dysfunction can lead to disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn ab

Subjects

synaptic neurophysiology | synaptic neurophysiology | neuron | neuron | synaptic fusion | synaptic fusion | synaptic release | synaptic release | synaptic plasticity | synaptic plasticity | neuronal circuits | neuronal circuits

License

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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT) 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain. This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain.

Subjects

neuroscience | neuroscience | vision | vision | hearing | hearing | neuroanatomy | neuroanatomy | color vision | color vision | blind spot | blind spot | retinal phototransduction | retinal phototransduction | cortical maps | cortical maps | primary visual cortex | primary visual cortex | complex cells | complex cells | extrastriate cortex | extrastriate cortex | ear | ear | cochlea | cochlea | basilar membrane | basilar membrane | auditory transduction | auditory transduction | hair cells | hair cells | phase-locking | phase-locking | sound localization | sound localization | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | somatosensory system | somatosensory system | motor system | motor system | synaptic transmission | synaptic transmission | action potential | action potential | sympathetic neurons | sympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | cellual neurophysiology | cellual neurophysiology | learning | learning | memory | memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.459 Scene Understanding Symposium (MIT) 9.459 Scene Understanding Symposium (MIT)

Description

What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding. What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding.

Subjects

circuits | mechanisms and representation | circuits | mechanisms and representation | recognition of a visual scene | recognition of a visual scene | Scene Understanding | Scene Understanding | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | cognitive neuroscience | cognitive neuroscience | visual cognition | visual cognition | computational neuroscience | computational neuroscience | computer vision | computer vision | natural image categorization | natural image categorization | contextual effects on object recognition | contextual effects on object recognition | role of attention in scene understanding | role of attention in scene understanding

License

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9.916 The Neural Basis of Visual Object Recognition in Monkeys and Humans (MIT) 9.916 The Neural Basis of Visual Object Recognition in Monkeys and Humans (MIT)

Description

Understanding the brain's remarkable ability for visual object recognition is one of the greatest challenges of brain research. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of key issues of object representation and to survey data from primate physiology and human fMRI that bear on those issues. Topics include the computational problems of object representation, the nature of object representations in the brain, the tolerance and selectivity of those representations, and the effects of attention and learning. Understanding the brain's remarkable ability for visual object recognition is one of the greatest challenges of brain research. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of key issues of object representation and to survey data from primate physiology and human fMRI that bear on those issues. Topics include the computational problems of object representation, the nature of object representations in the brain, the tolerance and selectivity of those representations, and the effects of attention and learning.

Subjects

vision | vision | object recognition | object recognition | monkey versus human | monkey versus human | object representations | object representations | fMRI | fMRI | temporal lobe | temporal lobe | visual cortex | visual cortex | neuronal representations | neuronal representations | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | retinal image | retinal image | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | perceptual awareness | perceptual awareness

License

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9.17 Systems Neuroscience Lab (MIT) 9.17 Systems Neuroscience Lab (MIT)

Description

Systems Neuroscience Laboratory consists of a series of laboratories designed to give students experience with basic techniques for conducting systems neuroscience research. It includes sessions on anatomical, neurophysiological, and data acquisition and analysis techniques, and the ways these techniques are used to study nervous system function. Training is provided in the art of scientific writing with feedback designed to improve writing skills. Assignments include weekly preparation for lab sessions, two major research reports and a series of basic computer programming tutorials (MATLAB®). The class involves the use of experimental animals. Enrollment is limited. Systems Neuroscience Laboratory consists of a series of laboratories designed to give students experience with basic techniques for conducting systems neuroscience research. It includes sessions on anatomical, neurophysiological, and data acquisition and analysis techniques, and the ways these techniques are used to study nervous system function. Training is provided in the art of scientific writing with feedback designed to improve writing skills. Assignments include weekly preparation for lab sessions, two major research reports and a series of basic computer programming tutorials (MATLAB®). The class involves the use of experimental animals. Enrollment is limited.

Subjects

laboratory | laboratory | experiment | experiment | protocol | protocol | neuroscience | neuroscience | nerves | nerves | nervous system | nervous system | electrophysiology | electrophysiology | action potential | action potential | neurophysiology | neurophysiology | rat barrel | rat barrel | MATLAB | MATLAB | frog | frog | fly | fly | vision | vision | physiology | physiology | human | human | MRI | MRI | EEG | EEG | electroencephalography | electroencephalography | ablation | ablation | computer modeling techniques | computer modeling techniques | brain function | brain function | histology | histology | neural tissue | neural tissue | surgery | surgery | laboratory notebook | laboratory notebook | scientific writing | scientific writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Spiders, yes, but why cats?

Description

Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Was Schubert a musical brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my mind?

Description

Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ?neuromania?. He shows why it is attractive, but al Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Spiders, yes, but why cats?

Description

Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Was Schubert a musical brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my mind?

Description

Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ?neuromania?. He shows why it is attractive, but al Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | Neurobehavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Biology of Pain

Description

A visual representation of the anatomy and physiology of pain which includes editable links to online resources.

Subjects

simulation | anatomy | physiology | nociception | inflammation | analgesia | nervous system | pain | neurophysiology | Safety | Medicine and Dentistry | Subjects allied to Medicine | Biological Sciences | Veterinary Sciences | Biological sciences | dentistry | Subjects allied to medicine | related subjects | C000 | A000 | B000 | D000 | HEALTH CARE / MEDICINE / HEALTH and SAFETY | P

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory.

Subjects

neuroscience | vision | hearing | neuroanatomy | color vision | blind spot | retinal phototransduction | center-surround receptive fields | corticalmaps | primary visual cortex | simple cells | complex cells | extrastriate cortex | ear | cochlea | basilar membrane | auditory transduction | hair cells | phase-locking | tonotopy | sound localization | auditory cortex | somatosensory system | motor system | synaptic transmission | action potential | sympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | cellual neurophysiology | learning | memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

artificial intelligence | psychology | philosophy | Turing Machines | consciousness | computer limitations | computation | neurophysiology | Turing test | the analog/digital distinction | Chinese Room argument | causal efficacy of content | inverted spectrum | mental representation | procedural semantics | connectionism

License

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24.119 Mind and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in the philosophy of mind, with an emphasis on consciousness and the mind-body problem.

Subjects

artificial intelligence | psychology | philosophy | turning machines | consciousness | computer limitations | computations | neurophysiology | Turing test | the analog/digital distinction | Chinese Room argument | causal efficacy of content | inverted spectrum | mental representation | procedural semantics | connectionism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.349 From Molecules to Behavior: Synaptic Neurophysiology (MIT)

Description

Like transistors in a computer, synapses perform complex computations and connect the brain's non-linear processing elements (neurons) into a functional circuit. Understanding the role of synapses in neuronal computation is essential to understanding how the brain works. In this course students will be introduced to cutting-edge research in the field of synaptic neurophysiology. The course will cover such topics as synapse formation, synaptic function, synaptic plasticity, the roles of synapses in higher cognitive processes and how synaptic dysfunction can lead to disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn ab

Subjects

synaptic neurophysiology | neuron | synaptic fusion | synaptic release | synaptic plasticity | neuronal circuits

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.17 Systems Neuroscience Lab (MIT)

Description

Systems Neuroscience Laboratory consists of a series of laboratories designed to give students experience with basic techniques for conducting systems neuroscience research. It includes sessions on anatomical, neurophysiological, and data acquisition and analysis techniques, and the ways these techniques are used to study nervous system function. Training is provided in the art of scientific writing with feedback designed to improve writing skills. Assignments include weekly preparation for lab sessions, two major research reports and a series of basic computer programming tutorials (MATLAB®). The class involves the use of experimental animals. Enrollment is limited.

Subjects

laboratory | experiment | protocol | neuroscience | nerves | nervous system | electrophysiology | action potential | neurophysiology | rat barrel | MATLAB | frog | fly | vision | physiology | human | MRI | EEG | electroencephalography | ablation | computer modeling techniques | brain function | histology | neural tissue | surgery | laboratory notebook | scientific writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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