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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT) 21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two. This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Muscovy | Empire | Empire | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Catherine II | Pugachev | Pugachev | nobility | nobility | Constitution | Constitution | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Nicholas I | Decembrists | Decembrists | serfdom | serfdom | Alexander II | Alexander II | Great reforms | Great reforms | intelligentsia | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Caucasus | Chechnya | Chechnya | Lenin | Lenin | World War I | World War I | Nicholas II | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Rasputin | Russia | Russia | social heritage | social heritage | cultural heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | autocracy | political reform | political reform | political revolution | political revolution | revolutionary | revolutionary | debates | debates | capitalism | capitalism | historical texts | historical texts | literary texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 19th century | 19th century | major European power | major European power | intellectual class | intellectual class | autocratic order | autocratic order | states | states | societies | societies | West | West | national consciousness | national consciousness | state | state | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT) 17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT)

Description

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra

Subjects

Strategy | Strategy | grand | grand | comparative | comparative | United States | United States | Great Britian | Great Britian | France | France | Germany | Germany | Russia | Russia | Europe | Europe | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | political | political | military | military | security | security | doctrine | doctrine | organizations | organizations | nationalism | nationalism | international | international | World War I | World War I | World War II | World War II | land warfare | land warfare | methods | methods | history | history | case study | case study

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | English literature | Novel | Novel | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Twentieth | Modernity | Modernity | Narrative | Narrative | Social criticism | Social criticism | Realism | Realism | Romance | Romance | Romantic | Romantic | Subjectivity | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | George Eliot | James Joyce | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT) CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods. This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | Media | mass media | mass media | history | history | Gutenberg | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural change | cultural history | cultural history | social history | social history | historiographic method | historiographic method | books | books | medieval history | medieval history | codex book | codex book | writing | writing | printing | printing | printing press | printing press | stage | stage | theater | theater | renaissance | renaissance | romanticism | romanticism | modernity | modernity | inventions | inventions | photography | photography | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | image | image | telegraph | telegraph | electrification | electrification | communication | communication | Morse | Morse | Daguerreotype | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | Fox Talbot | phonograph | phonograph | sound recording | sound recording | radio | radio | broadcasting | broadcasting | film | film | video | video | cinema | cinema | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The 1790s and after

Description

Presenter Oscar Cox Jensen (KCL) and discussant Jon Mee (York) look at Mark Philp's work focusing on the 1790s and after This talk, introduced by current Head of Department Elizabeth Frazer, is taken from 'A celebration and critical evaluation of the work of Mark Philp'. Mark Philp was our founding Head of Department (2000-2005) and Tutorial Fellow at Oriel College (1983-2013). He is now, since 2013, Professor of History at the University of Warwick. His work in the fields of political thought and political theory are notable for their interdisciplinarity as well as the excellence of their scholarship and depth of philosophical analysis. The event took place at the Department of Politics and International Relations on 22 April 2014. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Mark Philp | political theory | political history | nineteenth century | Mark Philp | political theory | political history | nineteenth century | 2014-04-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | rice | bowl | Chinese | East Asia | ordinary people | nineteenth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | primary sources | films | textbook | individual | family | lives | change | modern | readings | discussions | political events | daily | decisions | large-scale | social | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | Novel | 18th century | 19th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Modernity | Narrative | Social criticism | Realism | Romance | Romantic | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CHARTER: Showcasing Victorian Cultures Online

Description

This e-learning package was created during the CHARTER project which ran at the University of Exeter in 2008/9. Funded by JISC under the Enhancing Digital Resources strand of the Digitisation Programme, the CHARTER project aimed to 'make the hidden visible' by digitising and making available online digital surrogates of Exeter's outstanding Victorian culture collections. This involved establishing digitisation principles and practices, setting up a new online digital collections repository (using DSpace) and creating an e-learning showcase to demonstrate how the digital surrogates can be used in teaching and learning.

Subjects

victorian culture | nineteenth century | visual culture | media | bill douglas centre | university of exeter | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Peter Stockham Collection

Description

A finding aid for the nineteenth and early twentieth century children's books in the Peter Stockham Collection

Subjects

Peter Stockham children's books literature nineteenth century eraly twentieth century special collections

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | mass media | history | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural history | social history | historiographic method | books | medieval history | codex book | writing | printing | printing press | stage | theater | renaissance | romanticism | modernity | inventions | photography | nineteenth century | image | telegraph | electrification | communication | Morse | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | phonograph | sound recording | radio | broadcasting | film | video | cinema | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.466 Imperial and Revolutionary Russia, 1800-1917 (MIT)

Description

This subject analyzes Russia's social, cultural, political heritage; Eurasian imperialism; and autocracy. It compares reforming and revolutionary impulses in the context of serfdom, the rise of the intelligentsia, and debates over capitalism. This class focuses on historical and literary texts, and especially the intersections between the two.

Subjects

Muscovy | Empire | Peter the Great | Catherine II | Pugachev | nobility | Constitution | bureaucracy | Nicholas I | Decembrists | serfdom | Alexander II | Great reforms | intelligentsia | Caucasus | Chechnya | Lenin | World War I | Nicholas II | Rasputin | Russia | social heritage | cultural heritage | political heritage | Eurasian imperialism | autocracy | political reform | political revolution | revolutionary | debates | capitalism | historical texts | literary texts | nineteenth century | 19th century | major European power | intellectual class | autocratic order | states | societies | West | national consciousness | state | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | nineteenth century | 1800s | novel | great books | literary canon | American authors | colonial America | native American | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | United States | culture | historical context | African-American | authors | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | Civil War | Walt Whitman | gender | race | social | political | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | Novel | 18th century | 19th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Modernity | Narrative | Social criticism | Realism | Romance | Romantic | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine (MIT)

Description

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand stra

Subjects

Strategy | grand | comparative | United States | Great Britian | France | Germany | Russia | Europe | nineteenth century | twentieth century | political | military | security | doctrine | organizations | nationalism | international | World War I | World War II | land warfare | methods | history | case study

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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