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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT) 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

This subject deals with foundational knowledge for all students in NED. Emphasis is on nuclear concepts (as opposed to traditional nuclear physics), especially nuclear radiations and their interactions with matter. We will study different types of reactions, single-collision phenomena (cross sections) and leave the effects of many collisions to later subjects (22.105 and 22.106). Quantum mechanics is used at a lower level than in 22.51 and 22.106. This subject deals with foundational knowledge for all students in NED. Emphasis is on nuclear concepts (as opposed to traditional nuclear physics), especially nuclear radiations and their interactions with matter. We will study different types of reactions, single-collision phenomena (cross sections) and leave the effects of many collisions to later subjects (22.105 and 22.106). Quantum mechanics is used at a lower level than in 22.51 and 22.106.

Subjects

nuclear concepts | nuclear concepts | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear radiations | nuclear radiations | matter | matter | types of reactions | types of reactions | single-collision phenomena | single-collision phenomena | cross sections | cross sections | effects of many collisions | effects of many collisions | Quantum mechanics | Quantum mechanics

License

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT) II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .mht files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The Ma Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .mht files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The Ma

Subjects

nuclear physics | nuclear physics | atomic physics | atomic physics | experimental physics | experimental physics

License

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8.701 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (MIT) 8.701 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (MIT)

Description

The phenomenology and experimental foundations of particle and nuclear physics are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the fundamental forces and particles, as well as composites. The phenomenology and experimental foundations of particle and nuclear physics are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the fundamental forces and particles, as well as composites.

Subjects

QED | QED | Quantum ElectroDynamics | Quantum ElectroDynamics | QFD | QFD | Quantum FlavorDynamics | Quantum FlavorDynamics | QCD | QCD | Quantum ChromoDynamics | Quantum ChromoDynamics | Relativistic Kinematics | Relativistic Kinematics | Accelerators | Accelerators | Detectors | Detectors | Quark Model | Quark Model | Lepton-Nucleon scattering | Lepton-Nucleon scattering | QFT | QFT | Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear force | nuclear force | Relativistic heavy-ion physics | Relativistic heavy-ion physics | Particle astrophysics | Particle astrophysics | nuclear astrophysics | nuclear astrophysics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT) 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions. The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions.

Subjects

Nuclear physics | Nuclear physics | Nuclear reaction | Nuclear reaction | Nucleus | Nucleus | Nuclear radiation | Nuclear radiation | Quantum mechanics | Quantum mechanics | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | n-p scattering cross-section | n-p scattering cross-section | Transition probability per unit time | Transition probability per unit time | Barrier transmission probability | Barrier transmission probability | Binding energy | Binding energy | Nuclear stability | Nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Radioactive decay | Radioactive decay | Energetics | Energetics | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear reaction | nuclear reaction | nucleus | nucleus | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | transition probability per unit time | transition probability per unit time | barrier transmission probability | barrier transmission probability | nuclear stability | nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles | Interactions of charged particles | neutrons | neutrons | and gamma rays with matter | and gamma rays with matter | energetics | energetics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT) STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | computers | history | history | digital | digital | scientific instrument | scientific instrument | applied science | applied science | meteorology | meteorology | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | logic | logic | mathematics | mathematics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | biochemistry | aerospace | aerospace | medicine | medicine | supercomputing | supercomputing | distributed computing | distributed computing | linguistics | linguistics | humanities | humanities | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Physics

Description

Notre Dame OpenCourseware (OCW) offers free online educational resources for courses in the Department of Physics. Undergraduate physics majors are trained to use the most modern equipment, learn about the most current and exciting topics for research, and, most of all, learn to be problem solvers. As the "liberal arts" of the sciences, physics is a training ground for the mind which opens many avenues.

Subjects

nuclear physics | atomic physics | biophysics | ondensed matter | course | elementary particle physics | free | online | astrophysics | physics | OCW

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Nuclear and Particle Physics

Description

10 Relativistic kinematics

Subjects

ukoer | sfsoer | level 3 | nuclear physics | particle physics | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

This subject deals with foundational knowledge for all students in NED. Emphasis is on nuclear concepts (as opposed to traditional nuclear physics), especially nuclear radiations and their interactions with matter. We will study different types of reactions, single-collision phenomena (cross sections) and leave the effects of many collisions to later subjects (22.105 and 22.106). Quantum mechanics is used at a lower level than in 22.51 and 22.106.

Subjects

nuclear concepts | nuclear physics | nuclear radiations | matter | types of reactions | single-collision phenomena | cross sections | effects of many collisions | Quantum mechanics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .mht files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The Ma

Subjects

nuclear physics | atomic physics | experimental physics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.701 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (MIT)

Description

The phenomenology and experimental foundations of particle and nuclear physics are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the fundamental forces and particles, as well as composites.

Subjects

QED | Quantum ElectroDynamics | QFD | Quantum FlavorDynamics | QCD | Quantum ChromoDynamics | Relativistic Kinematics | Accelerators | Detectors | Quark Model | Lepton-Nucleon scattering | QFT | Quantum Field Theory | nuclear physics | nuclear force | Relativistic heavy-ion physics | Particle astrophysics | nuclear astrophysics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions.

Subjects

Nuclear physics | Nuclear reaction | Nucleus | Nuclear radiation | Quantum mechanics | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | n-p scattering cross-section | Transition probability per unit time | Barrier transmission probability | Binding energy | Nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Radioactive decay | Energetics | nuclear physics | nuclear reaction | nucleus | nuclear radiation | quantum mechanics | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | transition probability per unit time | barrier transmission probability | nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles | neutrons | and gamma rays with matter | energetics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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