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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | thorium fuel | thorium fuel | dry recycling | dry recycling | transmutation | transmutation | radioactive waste disposal | radioactive waste disposal | waste storage | waste storage | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | nuclear reactor analysis | nuclear reactor analysis | fuel cell design | fuel cell design | reactor design | reactor design | fast reactors | fast reactors | breeder reactors | breeder reactors | CANDU reactor | CANDU reactor | light water reactor | light water reactor | LWR | LWR | nuclear non-proliferation | nuclear non-proliferation | plutonium recycling | plutonium recycling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT) 22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files. This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear power | nuclear power | NRC | NRC | PWR | PWR | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | GFR | GFR | nuclear safety | nuclear safety | meltdown | meltdown | nuclear risk | nuclear risk | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | thermal | hydraulic | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | accident | accident | radiation | radiation | radioactivity | radioactivity | nuclear plant | nuclear plant | cooling | cooling | seabrook | seabrook | fission | fission | uranium | uranium | half-life | half-life | plutonium | plutonium

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.313 Thermal Hydraulics in Nuclear Power Technology (MIT) 22.313 Thermal Hydraulics in Nuclear Power Technology (MIT)

Description

This course covers the thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Specific topics include: kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows; steam separation; boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions; single-channel transient analysis; multiple channels connected at plena; loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation; and subchannel analysis.Starting in Spring 2007, this course will be offered jointly in the Departments of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Chemical Engineering, and will be titled "Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology." This course covers the thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Specific topics include: kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows; steam separation; boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions; single-channel transient analysis; multiple channels connected at plena; loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation; and subchannel analysis.Starting in Spring 2007, this course will be offered jointly in the Departments of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Chemical Engineering, and will be titled "Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology."

Subjects

reactor | reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | thermal behavior | thermal behavior | hydraulic | hydraulic | hydraulic behavior | hydraulic behavior | heat | heat | modeling | modeling | steam | steam | stability | stability | instability | instability | thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena | thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena | single-heated channel-transient analysis | single-heated channel-transient analysis | Multiple-heated channels | Multiple-heated channels | Loop analysis | Loop analysis | single and two-phase natural circulation | single and two-phase natural circulation | Kinematics | Kinematics | two-phase flows | two-phase flows | subchannel analysis | subchannel analysis | Core thermal analysis | Core thermal analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT) 5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca "Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | energy | environment | environment | society | society | energy initiative | energy initiative | project-based | project-based | energy management | energy management | project design | project design | renewable energy | renewable energy | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | transportation | transportation | wind power | wind power | wind mill | wind mill | energy recovery | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | infrastructure | climate | climate | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy calculator | energy calculator | solar power | solar power | solarthermal | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | greenhouse gas | emissions | emissions | turbines | turbines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy. This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.313J Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology (MIT) 22.313J Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology (MIT)

Description

This course covers the thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Specific topics include: kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows; steam separation; boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions; single-channel transient analysis; multiple channels connected at plena; loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation; and subchannel analysis. This course covers the thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Specific topics include: kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows; steam separation; boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions; single-channel transient analysis; multiple channels connected at plena; loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation; and subchannel analysis.

Subjects

reactor | reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | thermal behavior | thermal behavior | hydraulic | hydraulic | hydraulic behavior | hydraulic behavior | heat | heat | modeling | modeling | steam | steam | stability | stability | instability | instability | thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena | thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena | single-heated channel-transient analysis | single-heated channel-transient analysis | Multiple-heated channels | Multiple-heated channels | Loop analysis | Loop analysis | single and two-phase natural circulation | single and two-phase natural circulation | Kinematics | Kinematics | two-phase flows | two-phase flows | subchannel analysis | subchannel analysis | Core thermal analysis | Core thermal analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT) 22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations. This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear power | nuclear power | NRC | NRC | PWR | PWR | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | GFR | GFR | LWR | LWR | light water reactor | light water reactor | nuclear safety | nuclear safety | meltdown | meltdown | nuclear risk | nuclear risk | PRA | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | thermal | hydraulic | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | accident | accident | radiation radioactivity | radiation radioactivity | nuclear plant | nuclear plant | cooling Seabrook | cooling Seabrook | fission | fission | uranium | uranium | half-life | half-life | plutonium | plutonium | economics of nuclear power | economics of nuclear power | materials slection | materials slection | IRIS | IRIS | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control (MIT) 22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control (MIT)

Description

This short course provides an introduction to reactor dynamics including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of Xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Topics include the derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations; techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control; and an overview of light-water reactor startup. Lectures and demonstrations employ computer simulation and the use of the MIT Research Reactor. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This short course provides an introduction to reactor dynamics including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of Xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Topics include the derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations; techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control; and an overview of light-water reactor startup. Lectures and demonstrations employ computer simulation and the use of the MIT Research Reactor. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

reactor | reactor | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | radiation | radiation | feedback | feedback | light-water reactor | light-water reactor | neutron | neutron | reactor operation | reactor operation | reactor startup | reactor startup | reactor shutdown | reactor shutdown | reactor emergency | reactor emergency | pressurized water reactor | pressurized water reactor | PWR | PWR | BWR | BWR | criticality | criticality | reactor design | reactor design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors (MIT) 22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors (MIT)

Description

Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Topics include power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), structural mechanics, and engineering considerations in reactor design. Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Topics include power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), structural mechanics, and engineering considerations in reactor design.

Subjects

power | power | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | heat generation and removal | heat generation and removal | coolant flow | coolant flow | single-phase coolant flow | single-phase coolant flow | two-phase coolant flow | two-phase coolant flow | reactor design | reactor design | structural mechanics | structural mechanics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control (MIT)

Description

This short course provides an introduction to reactor dynamics including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of Xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Topics include the derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations; techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control; and an overview of light-water reactor startup. Lectures and demonstrations employ computer simulation and the use of the MIT Research Reactor. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

reactor | nuclear reactor | radiation | feedback | light-water reactor | neutron | reactor operation | reactor startup | reactor shutdown | reactor emergency | pressurized water reactor | PWR | BWR | criticality | reactor design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel cycle | thorium fuel | dry recycling | transmutation | radioactive waste disposal | waste storage | nuclear waste | nuclear reactor analysis | fuel cell design | reactor design | fast reactors | breeder reactors | CANDU reactor | light water reactor | LWR | nuclear non-proliferation | plutonium recycling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .exe and .zip. The .in files are input data files.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear power | NRC | PWR | pressurized water reactor | GFR | nuclear safety | meltdown | nuclear risk | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | accident | radiation | radioactivity | nuclear plant | cooling | seabrook | fission | uranium | half-life | plutonium

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.313 Thermal Hydraulics in Nuclear Power Technology (MIT)

Description

This course covers the thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Specific topics include: kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows; steam separation; boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions; single-channel transient analysis; multiple channels connected at plena; loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation; and subchannel analysis.Starting in Spring 2007, this course will be offered jointly in the Departments of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Chemical Engineering, and will be titled "Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology."

Subjects

reactor | nuclear reactor | thermal behavior | hydraulic | hydraulic behavior | heat | modeling | steam | stability | instability | thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena | single-heated channel-transient analysis | Multiple-heated channels | Loop analysis | single and two-phase natural circulation | Kinematics | two-phase flows | subchannel analysis | Core thermal analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors (MIT)

Description

Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Topics include power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), structural mechanics, and engineering considerations in reactor design.

Subjects

power | nuclear reactor | energy | thermodynamics | heat generation and removal | coolant flow | single-phase coolant flow | two-phase coolant flow | reactor design | structural mechanics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.313J Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology (MIT)

Description

This course covers the thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Specific topics include: kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows; steam separation; boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions; single-channel transient analysis; multiple channels connected at plena; loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation; and subchannel analysis.

Subjects

reactor | nuclear reactor | thermal behavior | hydraulic | hydraulic behavior | heat | modeling | steam | stability | instability | thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena | single-heated channel-transient analysis | Multiple-heated channels | Loop analysis | single and two-phase natural circulation | Kinematics | two-phase flows | subchannel analysis | Core thermal analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.39 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety (MIT)

Description

This course integrates studies of engineering sciences, reactor physics and safety assessment into nuclear power plant design. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity, safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, General Design Criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.

Subjects

nuclear reactor | nuclear power | NRC | PWR | pressurized water reactor | GFR | LWR | light water reactor | nuclear safety | meltdown | nuclear risk | PRA | probabalistic risk assessment | risk assessment | thermal | hydraulic | nuclear fuel | nuclear waste | accident | radiation radioactivity | nuclear plant | cooling Seabrook | fission | uranium | half-life | plutonium | economics of nuclear power | materials slection | IRIS | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control (MIT)

Description

This short course provides an introduction to reactor dynamics including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of Xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Topics include the derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations; techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control; and an overview of light-water reactor startup. Lectures and demonstrations employ computer simulation and the use of the MIT Research Reactor. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

reactor | nuclear reactor | radiation | feedback | light-water reactor | neutron | reactor operation | reactor startup | reactor shutdown | reactor emergency | pressurized water reactor | PWR | BWR | criticality | reactor design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | environment | society | energy initiative | project-based | energy management | project design | renewable energy | energy efficiency | transportation | wind power | wind mill | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | climate | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | energy calculator | solar power | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | emissions | turbines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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