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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT) 9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT)

Description

Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering. Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering.

Subjects

emergent | emergent | network | network | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | proteins | proteins | nucleic acids | nucleic acids | metabolism | metabolism | gene regulation | gene regulation | signal transduction | signal transduction | chemotaxis | chemotaxis | excitability | excitability | motility | motility | mitosis | mitosis | development | development | immunity | immunity | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | DNA computing | DNA computing | metabolic | metabolic | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | Neural networks | Neural networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Biochemistry

Description

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and compounds, such as cellular makeup, that bring about life in organisms. This course will look at how these formed biomolecules interact and produce many of life’s necessary processes. Also it will look at the most commonly used techniques in biochemistry research. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Biology 401; See also: Chemistry 109)

Subjects

biology | chemistry | biochemistry | amino acids | proteins | enzymes | carbohydrates | nucleic acids | lipids | metabolism | genes | chromosomes | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Organic Chemistry II

Description

This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. The student will focus on the four most important classes of reactions: electrophilic substitution at aromatic rings, nucleophilic addition at carbonyl compounds, hydrolysis of carboxylic acids, and carbon-carbon bond formation using enolates. This course also introduces biological molecules, including carbohydrates, peptides and proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, from a molecular perspective. The student will learn how chemical reactions involving these molecules, especially oxidation and reduction reactions, form the basis of all life. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Chemistry 104; See also: Biology 108)

Subjects

organic chemistry | ethers | epoxides | thiols | sulfides | dienes | benzene | aromatic | amines | aldehydes | ketones | carboxylic acids | esters | amides | anydrides | acyl halides | enols | enolates | carbohydrates | lipids | amino acids | nucleic acids | spectroscopy | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | DNA | RNA | genetics | genes | genetic material | double helix | molecular biology | biotechnology | structure | function | heredity | complementarity | biological materials | genetic code | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | tRNA | reverse transcription | central dogma | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT)

Description

Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering.

Subjects

emergent | network | chemical reactions | proteins | nucleic acids | metabolism | gene regulation | signal transduction | chemotaxis | excitability | motility | mitosis | development | immunity | molecular evolution | DNA computing | metabolic | genetic engineering | Neural networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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