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16.888 Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MIT) 16.888 Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization (MIT)

Description

This course is mainly focused on the quantitative aspects of design and presents a unifying framework called "Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization" (MSDO). The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context, focusing on three aspects of the problem: (i) The multidisciplinary character of engineering systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization. There is a version of this course (16.60s) offered through the MIT Professional Institute, targeted at professional engineers. This course is mainly focused on the quantitative aspects of design and presents a unifying framework called "Multidisciplinary System Design Optimization" (MSDO). The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context, focusing on three aspects of the problem: (i) The multidisciplinary character of engineering systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization. There is a version of this course (16.60s) offered through the MIT Professional Institute, targeted at professional engineers.

Subjects

optimization | optimization | multidisciplinary design optimization | multidisciplinary design optimization | MDO | MDO | subsystem identification | subsystem identification | interface design | interface design | linear constrained optimization fomulation | linear constrained optimization fomulation | non-linear constrained optimization formulation | non-linear constrained optimization formulation | scalar optimization | scalar optimization | vector optimization | vector optimization | systems engineering | systems engineering | complex systems | complex systems | heuristic search methods | heuristic search methods | tabu search | tabu search | simulated annealing | simulated annealing | genertic algorithms | genertic algorithms | sensitivity | sensitivity | tradeoff analysis | tradeoff analysis | goal programming | goal programming | isoperformance | isoperformance | pareto optimality | pareto optimality | flowchart | flowchart | design vector | design vector | simulation model | simulation model | objective vector | objective vector | input | input | discipline | discipline | output | output | coupling | coupling | multiobjective optimization | multiobjective optimization | optimization algorithms | optimization algorithms | tradespace exploration | tradespace exploration | numerical techniques | numerical techniques | direct methods | direct methods | penalty methods | penalty methods | heuristic techniques | heuristic techniques | SA | SA | GA | GA | approximation methods | approximation methods | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | isoperformace | isoperformace | output evaluation | output evaluation | MSDO framework | MSDO framework

License

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are the public debt and international economic issues. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are the public debt and international economic issues. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | the determination of output | the determination of output | employment | employment | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | inflation | inflation | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | as are the public debt and international economic issues | the determination of output | employment | unemployment | interest rates | and inflation | the determination of output | employment | unemployment | interest rates | and inflation | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | Monetary policies | Monetary policies | Fiscal policies | Fiscal policies

License

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6.823 Computer System Architecture (MIT) 6.823 Computer System Architecture (MIT)

Description

6.823 is a study of the evolution of computer architecture and the factors influencing the design of hardware and software elements of computer systems. Topics may include: instruction set design; processor micro-architecture and pipelining; cache and virtual memory organizations; protection and sharing; I/O and interrupts; in-order and out-of-order superscalar architectures; VLIW machines; vector supercomputers; multithreaded architectures; symmetric multiprocessors; and parallel computers. 6.823 is a study of the evolution of computer architecture and the factors influencing the design of hardware and software elements of computer systems. Topics may include: instruction set design; processor micro-architecture and pipelining; cache and virtual memory organizations; protection and sharing; I/O and interrupts; in-order and out-of-order superscalar architectures; VLIW machines; vector supercomputers; multithreaded architectures; symmetric multiprocessors; and parallel computers.

Subjects

computer architecture | | computer architecture | | computer system architecture | | computer system architecture | | hardware | | hardware | | hardware design | | hardware design | | software | | software | | software design | | software design | | instruction set design | | instruction set design | | processor micro-architecture | | processor micro-architecture | | pipelining | | pipelining | | cache memory | | cache memory | | irtual memory | | irtual memory | | I/O | | I/O | | input/output | | input/output | | interrupts | | interrupts | | superscalar architectures | | superscalar architectures | | VLIW machines | | VLIW machines | | vector supercomputers | | vector supercomputers | | multithreaded architectures | | multithreaded architectures | | symmetric multiprocessors | | symmetric multiprocessors | | parallel computers | parallel computers | computer architecture | computer architecture | computer system architecture | computer system architecture | hardware | hardware | hardware design | hardware design | software | software | software design | software design | instruction set design | instruction set design | processor micro-architecture | processor micro-architecture | pipelining | pipelining | cache memory | cache memory | virtual memory | virtual memory | I/O | I/O | input/output | input/output | interrupts | interrupts | superscalar architectures | superscalar architectures | VLIW machines | VLIW machines | vector supercomputers | vector supercomputers | multithreaded architectures | multithreaded architectures | symmetric multiprocessors | symmetric multiprocessors

License

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6.087 Practical Programming in C (MIT) 6.087 Practical Programming in C (MIT)

Description

This course provides a thorough introduction to the C programming language, the workhorse of the UNIX operating system and lingua franca of embedded processors and micro-controllers. The first two weeks will cover basic syntax and grammar, and expose students to practical programming techniques. The remaining lectures will focus on more advanced concepts, such as dynamic memory allocation, concurrency and synchronization, UNIX signals and process control, library development and usage. Daily programming assignments and weekly laboratory exercises are required. Knowledge of C is highly marketable for summer internships, UROPs, and full-time positions in software and embedded systems development. This course provides a thorough introduction to the C programming language, the workhorse of the UNIX operating system and lingua franca of embedded processors and micro-controllers. The first two weeks will cover basic syntax and grammar, and expose students to practical programming techniques. The remaining lectures will focus on more advanced concepts, such as dynamic memory allocation, concurrency and synchronization, UNIX signals and process control, library development and usage. Daily programming assignments and weekly laboratory exercises are required. Knowledge of C is highly marketable for summer internships, UROPs, and full-time positions in software and embedded systems development.

Subjects

writing C programs | writing C programs | compiling C programs | compiling C programs | variables and datatypes | variables and datatypes | control flow | control flow | input and output | input and output | pointers and memory addressing | pointers and memory addressing | arrays and pointer arithmetic | arrays and pointer arithmetic | memory allocation | memory allocation | stacks and queues | stacks and queues | hash tables | hash tables | C standard library | C standard library | dynamic memory allocation | dynamic memory allocation | multithreading | multithreading | concurrency | concurrency | asynchronous input/output | asynchronous input/output

License

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16.30 Feedback Control Systems (MIT) 16.30 Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course will teach fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, you should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are robust to some types of modeling errors and nonlinearities. You will learn to: Design controllers using state-space methods and analyze using classical tools. Understand impact of implementation issues (nonlinearity, delay). Indicate the robustness of your control design. Linearize a nonlinear system, and analyze stability. This course will teach fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, you should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are robust to some types of modeling errors and nonlinearities. You will learn to: Design controllers using state-space methods and analyze using classical tools. Understand impact of implementation issues (nonlinearity, delay). Indicate the robustness of your control design. Linearize a nonlinear system, and analyze stability.

Subjects

control design | control design | control analysis | control analysis | state-space methods | state-space methods | linear systems | linear systems | estimation filters | estimation filters | dynamic output feedback | dynamic output feedback | full state feedback | full state feedback | state estimation | state estimation | output feedback | output feedback | nonlinear analysis | nonlinear analysis | model uncertainty | model uncertainty | robustness | robustness

License

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti 6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti

Subjects

human-computer interfaces | human-computer interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | human information processor | human information processor | perception | perception | Fitts's Law | Fitts's Law | color | color | hearing | hearing | task analysis | task analysis | user-centered design | user-centered design | iterative design | iterative design | low-fidelity prototyping | low-fidelity prototyping | heuristic evaluation | heuristic evaluation | keystroke-level models | keystroke-level models | formative evaluation | formative evaluation | input models | input models | output models | output models | model-view-controller | model-view-controller | toolkits | toolkits | programming project | programming project | GUI | GUI | Java | Java

License

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Control (MIT) Control (MIT)

Description

6.241 examines linear, discrete- and continuous-time, and multi-input-output systems in control and related areas. Least squares and matrix perturbation problems are considered. Topics covered include: state-space models, modes, stability, controllability, observability, transfer function matrices, poles and zeros, minimality, internal stability of interconnected systems, feedback compensators, state feedback, optimal regulation, observers, observer-based compensators, measures of control performance, and robustness issues using singular values of transfer functions. Nonlinear systems are also introduced. 6.241 examines linear, discrete- and continuous-time, and multi-input-output systems in control and related areas. Least squares and matrix perturbation problems are considered. Topics covered include: state-space models, modes, stability, controllability, observability, transfer function matrices, poles and zeros, minimality, internal stability of interconnected systems, feedback compensators, state feedback, optimal regulation, observers, observer-based compensators, measures of control performance, and robustness issues using singular values of transfer functions. Nonlinear systems are also introduced.

Subjects

control | control | linear | linear | discrete | discrete | continuous-time | continuous-time | multi-input-output | multi-input-output | least squares | least squares | matrix perturbation | matrix perturbation | state-space models | stability | controllability | observability | transfer function matrices | poles | state-space models | stability | controllability | observability | transfer function matrices | poles | zeros | zeros | minimality | minimality | feedback | feedback | compensators | compensators | state feedback | state feedback | optimal regulation | optimal regulation | observers | transfer functions | observers | transfer functions | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | linear systems | linear systems

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA | 11.482 | 11.482 | 1.285 | 1.285 | ESD.193 | ESD.193

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA | assessment | assessment | infrastructure | infrastructure | housing | housing | energy | energy | environment | environment | 11.482 | 11.482 | 1.285 | 1.285 | ESD.193 | ESD.193

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.171 Analysis and Design of Digital Control Systems (MIT) 2.171 Analysis and Design of Digital Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is a comprehensive introduction to control system synthesis in which the digital computer plays a major role, reinforced with hands-on laboratory experience. The course covers elements of real-time computer architecture; input-output interfaces and data converters; analysis and synthesis of sampled-data control systems using classical and modern (state-space) methods; analysis of trade-offs in control algorithms for computation speed and quantization effects. Laboratory projects emphasize practical digital servo interfacing and implementation problems with timing, noise, and nonlinear devices. This course is a comprehensive introduction to control system synthesis in which the digital computer plays a major role, reinforced with hands-on laboratory experience. The course covers elements of real-time computer architecture; input-output interfaces and data converters; analysis and synthesis of sampled-data control systems using classical and modern (state-space) methods; analysis of trade-offs in control algorithms for computation speed and quantization effects. Laboratory projects emphasize practical digital servo interfacing and implementation problems with timing, noise, and nonlinear devices.

Subjects

digital computer | digital computer | computation | computation | real-time computer | real-time computer | input-output | input-output | I/O | I/O | interface | interface | data converter | data converter | A/D converter | A/D converter | sampling | sampling | state-space | state-space | algorithm | algorithm | quantization | quantization | servo | servo | timing | timing | noise | noise | nonlinear | nonlinear | nonlinearity | nonlinearity | non-linear | non-linear

License

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6.241J Dynamic Systems and Control (MIT) 6.241J Dynamic Systems and Control (MIT)

Description

The course addresses dynamic systems, i.e., systems that evolve with time. Typically these systems have inputs and outputs; it is of interest to understand how the input affects the output (or, vice-versa, what inputs should be given to generate a desired output). In particular, we will concentrate on systems that can be modeled by Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), and that satisfy certain linearity and time-invariance conditions. We will analyze the response of these systems to inputs and initial conditions. It is of particular interest to analyze systems obtained as interconnections (e.g., feedback) of two or more other systems. We will learn how to design (control) systems that ensure desirable properties (e.g., stability, performance) of the interconnection with a given dynamic s The course addresses dynamic systems, i.e., systems that evolve with time. Typically these systems have inputs and outputs; it is of interest to understand how the input affects the output (or, vice-versa, what inputs should be given to generate a desired output). In particular, we will concentrate on systems that can be modeled by Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), and that satisfy certain linearity and time-invariance conditions. We will analyze the response of these systems to inputs and initial conditions. It is of particular interest to analyze systems obtained as interconnections (e.g., feedback) of two or more other systems. We will learn how to design (control) systems that ensure desirable properties (e.g., stability, performance) of the interconnection with a given dynamic s

Subjects

dynamic systems | dynamic systems | multiple inputs | multiple inputs | multiple outputs | multiple outputs | MIMO | MIMO | feedback | feedback | control systems | control systems | linear time-invariant | linear time-invariant | optimal control | optimal control | robust control | robust control | linear algebra | linear algebra | least squares | least squares

License

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT) 6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho. This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho.

Subjects

introduction to MATLAB | introduction to MATLAB | scripts | scripts | making variables | making variables | manipulating variables | manipulating variables | functions | functions | flow control | flow control | line plots | line plots | surface plots | surface plots | vectorization | vectorization | linear algebra | linear algebra | optimization | optimization | differential equations | differential equations | data structures | data structures | debugging | debugging | animation | animation | symbolic math | symbolic math | Simulink | Simulink | file input/output | file input/output | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces

License

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6.092 Introduction to Programming in Java (MIT) 6.092 Introduction to Programming in Java (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language. It covers concepts useful to 6.005. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. The course is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.005 should not take this course. Each class is composed of one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course is an introduction to software engineering, using the Java™ programming language. It covers concepts useful to 6.005. Students will learn the fundamentals of Java. The focus is on developing high quality, working software that solves real problems. The course is designed for students with some programming experience, but if you have none and are motivated you will do fine. Students who have taken 6.005 should not take this course. Each class is composed of one hour of lecture and one hour of assisted lab work. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

software engineering | software engineering | Java fundamentals | Java fundamentals | methods | methods | conditionals | conditionals | loops | loops | arrays | arrays | objects | objects | classes | classes | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | access control | access control | class scope | class scope | design | design | debugging | debugging | interfaces | interfaces | inheritance | inheritance | exceptions | exceptions | input/output | input/output

License

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6.088 Introduction to C Memory Management and C++ Object-Oriented Programming (MIT) 6.088 Introduction to C Memory Management and C++ Object-Oriented Programming (MIT)

Description

Ever hang your head in shame after your Python program wasn't as fast as your friend's C program? Ever wish you could use objects without having to use Java? Join us for this fun introduction to C and C++! We will take you through a tour that will start with writing simple C programs, go deep into the caves of C memory manipulation, resurface with an introduction to using C++ classes, dive deeper into advanced C++ class use and the C++ Standard Template Libraries. We'll wrap up by teaching you some tricks of the trade that you may need for tech interviews. We see this as a "C/C++ empowerment" course: we want you to come away understanding why you would want to use C over another language (control over memory, probably for performance reasons), why you would want to use C++ ra Ever hang your head in shame after your Python program wasn't as fast as your friend's C program? Ever wish you could use objects without having to use Java? Join us for this fun introduction to C and C++! We will take you through a tour that will start with writing simple C programs, go deep into the caves of C memory manipulation, resurface with an introduction to using C++ classes, dive deeper into advanced C++ class use and the C++ Standard Template Libraries. We'll wrap up by teaching you some tricks of the trade that you may need for tech interviews. We see this as a "C/C++ empowerment" course: we want you to come away understanding why you would want to use C over another language (control over memory, probably for performance reasons), why you would want to use C++ ra

Subjects

C | C | C++ | C++ | programming languages | programming languages | abstraction | abstraction | memory management | memory management | speed | speed | pointers | pointers | structs | structs | memory manipulation | memory manipulation | object oriented programming | object oriented programming | oop | oop | objects | objects | encapsulation | encapsulation | classes | classes | input | input | output | output | inheritance | inheritance | polymorphism | polymorphism | templates | templates | standard library | standard library | binary search tree | binary search tree | arithmetic expression | arithmetic expression | eval | eval | print | print

License

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6.823 Computer System Architecture (MIT) 6.823 Computer System Architecture (MIT)

Description

6.823 is a course in the department's "Computer Systems and Architecture" concentration. 6.823 is a study of the evolution of computer architecture and the factors influencing the design of hardware and software elements of computer systems. Topics may include: instruction set design; processor micro-architecture and pipelining; cache and virtual memory organizations; protection and sharing; I/O and interrupts; in-order and out-of-order superscalar architectures; VLIW machines; vector supercomputers; multithreaded architectures; symmetric multiprocessors; and parallel computers. 6.823 is a course in the department's "Computer Systems and Architecture" concentration. 6.823 is a study of the evolution of computer architecture and the factors influencing the design of hardware and software elements of computer systems. Topics may include: instruction set design; processor micro-architecture and pipelining; cache and virtual memory organizations; protection and sharing; I/O and interrupts; in-order and out-of-order superscalar architectures; VLIW machines; vector supercomputers; multithreaded architectures; symmetric multiprocessors; and parallel computers.

Subjects

computer architecture | computer architecture | computer system architecture | computer system architecture | hardware | hardware | hardware design | hardware design | software | software | software design | software design | instruction set design | instruction set design | processor micro-architecture | processor micro-architecture | pipelining | pipelining | cache memory | cache memory | virtual memory | virtual memory | I/O | I/O | input/output | input/output | interrupts | interrupts | superscalar architectures | superscalar architectures | VLIW machines | VLIW machines | vector supercomputers | vector supercomputers | multithreaded architectures | multithreaded architectures | symmetric multiprocessors | symmetric multiprocessors | parallel computers | parallel computers | computer system | computer system

License

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6.011 Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing (MIT) 6.011 Introduction to Communication, Control, and Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is taken mainly by undergraduates, and explores ideas involving signals, systems and probabilistic models in the context of communication, control and signal processing applications. The material expands out from the basics in 6.003 and 6.041. The treatment involves aspects of analysis, synthesis, and optimization. Topics covered differ somewhat from semester to semester, but typically include: random processes, correlations, spectral densities, state-space modeling, multirate processing, signal estimation and detection. This course is taken mainly by undergraduates, and explores ideas involving signals, systems and probabilistic models in the context of communication, control and signal processing applications. The material expands out from the basics in 6.003 and 6.041. The treatment involves aspects of analysis, synthesis, and optimization. Topics covered differ somewhat from semester to semester, but typically include: random processes, correlations, spectral densities, state-space modeling, multirate processing, signal estimation and detection.

Subjects

Input-output | Input-output | state-space models | state-space models | linear systems | linear systems | deterministic and random signals | deterministic and random signals | time- and transform-domain representations | time- and transform-domain representations | sampling | sampling | discrete-time processing | discrete-time processing | continuous-time signals | continuous-time signals | state feedback | state feedback | observers | observers | probabilistic models | probabilistic models | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | correlation functions | correlation functions | power spectra | power spectra | whitening filters | whitening filters | Detection | Detection | matched filters | matched filters | Least-mean square error estimation | Least-mean square error estimation | Wiener filtering | Wiener filtering

License

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6.435 System Identification (MIT) 6.435 System Identification (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduates and includes topics such as mathematical models of systems from observations of their behavior; time series, state-space, and input-output models; model structures, parametrization, and identifiability; non-parametric methods; prediction error methods for parameter estimation, convergence, consistency, and asymptotic distribution; relations to maximum likelihood estimation; recursive estimation; relation to Kalman filters; structure determination; order estimation; Akaike criterion; bounded but unknown noise model; and robustness and practical issues. This course is offered to graduates and includes topics such as mathematical models of systems from observations of their behavior; time series, state-space, and input-output models; model structures, parametrization, and identifiability; non-parametric methods; prediction error methods for parameter estimation, convergence, consistency, and asymptotic distribution; relations to maximum likelihood estimation; recursive estimation; relation to Kalman filters; structure determination; order estimation; Akaike criterion; bounded but unknown noise model; and robustness and practical issues.

Subjects

mathematical models | mathematical models | time series | time series | state-space | state-space | input-output models | input-output models | model structures | model structures | parametrization | parametrization | identifiability | identifiability | non-parametric methods | non-parametric methods | prediction error | prediction error | parameter estimation | parameter estimation | convergence | convergence | consistency | consistency | andasymptotic distribution | andasymptotic distribution | maximum likelihood estimation | maximum likelihood estimation | recursive estimation | recursive estimation | Kalman filters | Kalman filters | structure determination | structure determination | order estimation | order estimation | Akaike criterion | Akaike criterion | bounded noise models | bounded noise models | robustness | robustness

License

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6.243J Dynamics of Nonlinear Systems (MIT) 6.243J Dynamics of Nonlinear Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to nonlinear deterministic dynamical systems. Topics covered include: nonlinear ordinary differential equations; planar autonomous systems; fundamental theory: Picard iteration, contraction mapping theorem, and Bellman-Gronwall lemma; stability of equilibria by Lyapunov's first and second methods; feedback linearization; and application to nonlinear circuits and control systems. This course provides an introduction to nonlinear deterministic dynamical systems. Topics covered include: nonlinear ordinary differential equations; planar autonomous systems; fundamental theory: Picard iteration, contraction mapping theorem, and Bellman-Gronwall lemma; stability of equilibria by Lyapunov's first and second methods; feedback linearization; and application to nonlinear circuits and control systems.

Subjects

nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | deterministic dynamical systems | deterministic dynamical systems | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | planar autonomous systems | planar autonomous systems | Picard iteration | Picard iteration | contraction mapping theorem | contraction mapping theorem | Bellman-Gronwall lemma | Bellman-Gronwall lemma | Lyapunov methods | Lyapunov methods | feedback linearization | feedback linearization | nonlinear circuits | nonlinear circuits | control systems | control systems | local controllability | local controllability | volume evolution | volume evolution | system analysis | system analysis | singular perturbations | singular perturbations | averaging | averaging | local behavior | local behavior | trajectories | trajectories | equilibria | equilibria | storage functions | storage functions | stability analysis | stability analysis | continuity | continuity | differential equations | differential equations | system models | system models | parameters | parameters | input/output | input/output | state-space | state-space | 16.337 | 16.337

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

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11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT) 11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT)

Description

This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester. This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester.

Subjects

regional energy environmental modeling | regional energy environmental modeling | policies | policies | microeconomics | microeconomics | economic modeling | economic modeling | economic modeling techniques | economic modeling techniques | input-output | input-output | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | linear programming | linear programming | logit | logit | regression | regression | green accounting | green accounting | spatial energy demand | spatial energy demand | spatial energy supply | spatial energy supply | energy forecast | energy forecast | regional energy prices | regional energy prices | regional energy consumption | regional energy consumption | regional energy production | regional energy production

License

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | economics | economics | output | output | employment | employment | determination | determination | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | Federal Reserve | Federal Reserve | inflation | inflation | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | public debt | public debt | international economics | international economics | goods market | goods market | market | market | financial markets | financial markets | open economy | open economy | exchange rate | exchange rate | labor market | labor market | phillips curve | phillips curve | growth | growth | Solow's model | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Economics | Output | Output | Employment | Employment | Determination | Determination | Unemployment | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Interest Rates | Inflation | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | Public Debt | International Economics | International Economics | Goods Market | Goods Market | Market | Market | Financial Markets | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Phillips Curve | Growth | Growth | Solow's Model | Solow's Model

License

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6.087 Practical Programming in C (MIT)

Description

This course provides a thorough introduction to the C programming language, the workhorse of the UNIX operating system and lingua franca of embedded processors and micro-controllers. The first two weeks will cover basic syntax and grammar, and expose students to practical programming techniques. The remaining lectures will focus on more advanced concepts, such as dynamic memory allocation, concurrency and synchronization, UNIX signals and process control, library development and usage. Daily programming assignments and weekly laboratory exercises are required. Knowledge of C is highly marketable for summer internships, UROPs, and full-time positions in software and embedded systems development.

Subjects

writing C programs | compiling C programs | variables and datatypes | control flow | input and output | pointers and memory addressing | arrays and pointer arithmetic | memory allocation | stacks and queues | hash tables | C standard library | dynamic memory allocation | multithreading | concurrency | asynchronous input/output

License

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