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Sovereign Equality and Moral Disagreement: Premises of a Pluralist International Legal Order

Description

Professor Brad Roth, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Wayne State, Detroit, gives a talk for the ELAC/CCW seminar series on 17th May 2011. Introduced by Dr David Rodin. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

equality | peace | pluralism | politics | ethics | United Nations | war | armed conflict | equality | peace | pluralism | politics | ethics | United Nations | war | armed conflict | 2011-05-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT) 17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism. In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | social capital | civil society | civil society | social networks | social networks | community norms | community norms | associational activities | associational activities | state | state | democracy | democracy | government | government | economic development | economic development | social welfare | social welfare | democratization | democratization | pluralism | pluralism | public goods provision | public goods provision | state capacity | state capacity | international politics | international politics | globalization | globalization | social sanctions | social sanctions | political participation | political participation | social movements | social movements | civic engagement | civic engagement | politics | politics | political science | political science | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social justice | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT) 17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT)

Description

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do

Subjects

citizenship | citizenship | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | democracy | democracy | nations | nations | politics | politics | class differentiation | class differentiation | pluralism | pluralism | national unity | national unity | contemporary | contemporary | political | political | philosophy | philosophy | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | racial | racial | ethnic | ethnic | groups | groups | national | national | minorities | minorities | aboriginals | aboriginals | women | women | sexual | sexual | injustice | injustice | recognition | recognition | accommodation | accommodation | democratic | democratic | states | states | group-differentiated | group-differentiated | rights | rights | exemptions | exemptions | laws | laws | representation | representation | language | language | limited | limited | self-government | self-government | theories | theories | justice | justice | conflict | conflict | liberalequality | liberalequality | citizens | citizens | multi-religious | multi-religious | multicultural | multicultural | society | society | diversity | diversity | communitarian | communitarian | civic | civic | republican | republican | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan | pluralist | pluralist | radical | radical | postmodern | postmodern | American | American | gender | gender | class | class | differentiation | differentiation | liberal | liberal | equality | equality | unity | unity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT) 17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others. This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | norms of justice | interstate | interstate | political justice | political justice | economic justice | economic justice | human rights | human rights | skepticism about global justice | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | global democracy | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | rights to control borders | Kant | Kant | Habermas | Habermas | Rawls | Rawls | Sen | Sen | Beitz | Beitz | Nussbaum | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 17.000 | 24.611 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Pluralism and Determinism

Description

Thomas Sattig (Tübingen) gives a talk for the Power Structualism in Ancient Ontologies series. Abstract: 'Pluralists about material objects believe that distinct material objects can coincide at a time?that they can exactly occupy the same spatial region and be constituted by the same matter at that time. Pluralism is often accepted for reasons of common sense. It seems obvious, for example, that there could be a piece of paper and a paper airplane made from the latter, such that the piece of paper exists before the paper plane is created or exists after the paper plane is destroyed. The artifacts in this scenario would appear to be distinct objects that coincide at various times. My aim is to argue that folk-inspired pluralism faces a serious problem concerning determinism. The actual Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | determinism | pluralism | ontology | philosophy | determinism | pluralism | ontology

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Pluralism and Human Rights

Description

The 2014 Isaiah Berlin lecture was given by highly respected philosopher and crossbench peer, Baroness Onora O?Neill. The Lecture was introduced by the President of Wolfson College, Dame Hermione Lee. Baroness O?Neill?s lecture addressed a variety of issues surrounding the difficult philosophical subject of human rights: how can we overcome the conflicts between different cultural values and the lexicon of human rights that has now entered the international legal architecture? How can we strike a fair balance between the competing claims of often contradictory rights e.g. how can we balance the right to freedom of expression with the prohibition on racial hatred? She began her lecture by addressing the arguments Sir Isaiah Berlin had put forwards regarding the value conflicts that pl Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | isaiah berlin | pluralism | conflict | human rights | isaiah berlin | pluralism | conflict | 2014-05-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | civil society | social networks | community norms | associational activities | state | democracy | government | economic development | social welfare | democratization | pluralism | public goods provision | state capacity | international politics | globalization | social sanctions | political participation | social movements | civic engagement | politics | political science | ethnic conflict | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | interstate | political justice | economic justice | human rights | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | Kant | Habermas | Rawls | Sen | Beitz | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | Aristotle | political research | regimes | Marxist model | class alliances | democracy | pluralism | economic growth | party formation | political elites | interest groups | constitutional reform | political system | constitutional choice | leadership | state formation | modernization | political institution | embedded autonomy | dead capital | nationalism | electoral behavior | clientelism | patronage politics | corruption | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.955 Civil Society, Social Capital, and the State in Comparative Perspective (MIT)

Description

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Subjects

social capital | civil society | social networks | community norms | associational activities | state | democracy | government | economic development | social welfare | democratization | pluralism | public goods provision | state capacity | international politics | globalization | social sanctions | political participation | social movements | civic engagement | politics | political science | ethnic conflict | social justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT)

Description

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do

Subjects

citizenship | ethnicity | identity | democracy | nations | politics | class differentiation | pluralism | national unity | contemporary | political | philosophy | multiculturalism | racial | ethnic | groups | national | minorities | aboriginals | women | sexual | injustice | recognition | accommodation | democratic | states | group-differentiated | rights | exemptions | laws | representation | language | limited | self-government | theories | justice | conflict | liberalequality | citizens | multi-religious | multicultural | society | diversity | communitarian | civic | republican | cosmopolitan | pluralist | radical | postmodern | American | gender | class | differentiation | liberal | equality | unity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | interstate | political justice | economic justice | human rights | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | Kant | Habermas | Rawls | Sen | Beitz | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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