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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | president | president | terror | terror | war | war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Political Economy of Reconstituted Neoliberalism: Reflections on Bolivia and Latin American Neostructuralism

Description

Jeffery R. Webber, Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Queen Mary, University of London, gives a talk on 26th Jan 2012 for the Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series. The Historical Materialism and International Relations seminar series seeks to explore and develop the multiple points of contact between Marxist theory and international relations, most broadly defined. It does so with the double aim of investigating the critical and explanatory potentials of Marxism in the domain of international relations, as well as to probe what an engagement with 'the international' might contribute to Marxist theory. The seminar series is associated with the journal of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory and its forthcoming 'Historical Mat Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

bolivia | political economy | neoliberalism | Latin America | bolivia | political economy | neoliberalism | Latin America

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Celebrating Gavin Williams: The political economy of development in an industrialising rural area of South India

Description

Judith Heyer gives a talk in the Agrarian Societies section of the Celebrating Gavin Williams conference, held in Oxford on 9-10 July 2010. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

political economy | politics | agricultural society | india | political economy | politics | agricultural society | india | 2010-07-09

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.165 Infrastructure in Crisis: Energy and Security Challenges (MIT) 11.165 Infrastructure in Crisis: Energy and Security Challenges (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this seminar is to examine efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance and regulate infrastructure systems and services that affect energy security. We will introduce a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. During the seminar, students will explore how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. The sessions will be used to introduce the challenges to modern society concerning energy security, and for students to study how food security and energy security are intertwined, as well as how infrastructure supports the energy system. We will review the moral hazard aspects of infrastructure and the common arguments for withholding adequate support to the reb The purpose of this seminar is to examine efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance and regulate infrastructure systems and services that affect energy security. We will introduce a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. During the seminar, students will explore how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. The sessions will be used to introduce the challenges to modern society concerning energy security, and for students to study how food security and energy security are intertwined, as well as how infrastructure supports the energy system. We will review the moral hazard aspects of infrastructure and the common arguments for withholding adequate support to the reb

Subjects

Energy infrastructure | Energy infrastructure | energy crisis | energy crisis | energy security | energy security | economics of public goods and infrastructure | economics of public goods and infrastructure | Infrastructure development | Infrastructure development | infrastructure policy | infrastructure policy | infrastructure financing | infrastructure financing | energy system | energy system | food security | food security | political economy of energy | political economy of energy | long term development of energy | long term development of energy | infrastructure delivery | infrastructure delivery

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and

Subjects

public sector | public sector | policies | policies | programs | programs | projects | projects | poverty | poverty | unemployment | unemployment | developing countries | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | informal sector | informal sector | small enterprises | small enterprises | political economy | political economy | local economic development initiatives | local economic development initiatives | implementation | implementation | worker conditions | worker conditions | associations | associations | government reform | government reform | poverty reduction | poverty reduction | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. In this course students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | ESD.284J | ESD.284J | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284 | 11.418 | 11.418 | ESD.192 | ESD.192

License

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Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. This class surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. It examines and critiques accounting frameworks including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. It will assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of U.S. and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change (MIT)

Description

Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class. Students examine and critique accounting frameworks, including accounting for the underground economy, multipliers, linkages, and supply chains used to assess employment and environmental impacts and infrastructure investments. They also assess the value of price indices, industrial location and employment measures, and shift-share analyses. Discussions of US and foreign applications and their relation will be featured in the class.

Subjects

economic growth | economic growth | international economies | international economies | developing countries | developing countries | growth | growth | restructuring | restructuring | innovation | innovation | accounting | accounting | industrialized and emerging countries | industrialized and emerging countries | accounting frameworks | accounting frameworks | microeconomics | microeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | political economy | political economy | china and the united states | china and the united states | 11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.284 | ESD.284

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.884J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | economics | economics | political economy | political economy | democratic | democratic | countries | countries | collective | collective | choice | choice | electoral competiton | electoral competiton | public goods | public goods | size | size | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | voting models | voting models | equilibrium models | equilibrium models | information | information | learning | learning | agency models | agency models | political parties | political parties | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | resource allocation | resource allocation | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | legislatures | legislatures | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | stability | stability | informational | informational | distributive | distributive | theories | theories | executive | executive | relations | relations | representative democracy | representative democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.471 Public Economics I (MIT) 14.471 Public Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course is a one-semester introduction to the economic analysis of taxation. It covers both theoretical contributions, such as the theory of optimal income and commodity taxation, as well as empirical work, such as the study of how taxes affect labor supply. The course is designed to acquaint students with key questions in the economics of taxation, and to equip them to carry out their own research in this field. This course is a one-semester introduction to the economic analysis of taxation. It covers both theoretical contributions, such as the theory of optimal income and commodity taxation, as well as empirical work, such as the study of how taxes affect labor supply. The course is designed to acquaint students with key questions in the economics of taxation, and to equip them to carry out their own research in this field.

Subjects

economic analysis | economic analysis | taxation | taxation | wealth | wealth | financial policy | financial policy | income | income | investment | investment | asset | asset | political economy | political economy | labor | labor | capital | capital | public policy | public policy | theory | theory | evidence | evidence | government taxation policy | government taxation policy | tax incidence | tax incidence | optimal tax theory | optimal tax theory | labor supply | labor supply | savings | savings | corrective taxes for externalities | corrective taxes for externalities | corporate behavior | corporate behavior | tax expenditure policy | tax expenditure policy | theory of optimal income | theory of optimal income | commodity taxation | commodity taxation | calculus-based microeconomic analysis | calculus-based microeconomic analysis | duality methods | duality methods | household theory | household theory | firm theory | firm theory | growth theory | growth theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | presiden | presiden | terror; war | terror; war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security | terror | terror | war | war

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT) 17.812J Collective Choice I (MIT)

Description

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective. This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Subjects

political economy | political economy | rational choice | rational choice | legislature | legislature | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | court | court | and elections | and elections | electoral competition | electoral competition | comparative | comparative | international | international | public goods | public goods | government | government | taxation | taxation | income redistribution | income redistribution | macroeconomic policy | macroeconomic policy | multiparty competition | multiparty competition | electoral system | electoral system | voter | voter | agency models | agency models | models of political parties | models of political parties | point-valued solution | point-valued solution | set-valued solution | set-valued solution | probabilistic voting models | probabilistic voting models | structure-induced equilibrium models | structure-induced equilibrium models | vote-buying | vote-buying | vote-trading | vote-trading | Colonel Blotto | Colonel Blotto | minorities | minorities | interest groups | interest groups | lobbying | lobbying | bargaining | bargaining | coalitions | coalitions | government stability | government stability | informational theory | informational theory | distributive theory | distributive theory | legislative-executive relations | legislative-executive relations | representative democracy | representative democracy | direct democracy | direct democracy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT) 17.57J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991 (MIT)

Description

At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death, At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political strife after Lenin's death, industrialization, collectivization, a second famine, political Show Trials, World War II, post-war reconstruction and repression, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death,

Subjects

Soviet Union | Soviet Union | politics | politics | communism | communism | history | history | socialist republics | socialist republics | world war two | world war two | stalin | stalin | khruschev | khruschev | brezhnev | brezhnev | october revolution | october revolution | political economy | political economy | lenin | lenin | industrialization | industrialization | collectivism | collectivism | repression | repression | society | society | culture | culture | Soviet system | Soviet system | U.S.S.R. | U.S.S.R. | Soviet society | Soviet society | political reform | political reform | social reform | social reform | revolutionary regime | revolutionary regime | Stalin revolution | Stalin revolution | post-Stalinist | post-Stalinist | Soviet collapse | Soviet collapse | political history | political history | 17.57 | 17.57 | 21H.467 | 21H.467

License

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14.73 The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT) 14.73 The Challenge of World Poverty (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poo Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor—or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poo

Subjects

world poverty | world poverty | consumption | consumption | food | food | health | health | education | education | family | family | insurance | insurance | risk | risk | credit | credit | savings | savings | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | political economy | political economy | economics | economics

License

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11.165 Infrastructure and Energy Technology Challenges (MIT) 11.165 Infrastructure and Energy Technology Challenges (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance, and regulate infrastructure and energy technologies from a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. It is conducted with intensive in-class discussions and debates. This seminar examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance, and regulate infrastructure and energy technologies from a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. It is conducted with intensive in-class discussions and debates.

Subjects

Energy infrastructure | Energy infrastructure | energy crisis | energy crisis | energy security | energy security | economics of public goods and infrastructure | economics of public goods and infrastructure | Infrastructure development | Infrastructure development | infrastructure policy | infrastructure policy | infrastructure financing | infrastructure financing | energy system | energy system | food security | food security | political economy of energy | political economy of energy | long term development of energy | long term development of energy | infrastructure delivery | infrastructure delivery

License

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11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.471 Targeting the Poor: Local Economic Development in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t. This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to increase employment through development-promoting measures in the economic realm, through support and regulation. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and environments that are most conducive to equitable outcomes, and emphasizes throughout the understandings gained about why certain initiatives work and others don’t.

Subjects

local economic development | local economic development | poverty | poverty | developing countries | developing countries | public-sector policies | public-sector policies | employment | employment | labor standards | labor standards | environmental standards | environmental standards | political economy | political economy | poverty reduction | poverty reduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | social change | social change | urbanism | urbanism | urban growth | urban growth | environmental sociology | environmental sociology | human ecology | human ecology | underclass | underclass | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | built environment | built environment | race and politics | race and politics | political economy | political economy | urban villages | urban villages | globalization | globalization | social justice | social justice | community | community | social networks | social networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures. This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures.

Subjects

11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.192 | ESD.192 | regional growth | regional growth | political economy | political economy | spatial economic analysis | spatial economic analysis | regional economic growth | regional economic growth | economics | economics | regional theories | regional theories | regional planning | regional planning | regional and urban economics | regional and urban economics | neoclassical | neoclassical | dispersal economies | dispersal economies | regional accounting | regional accounting | social accounting matrices | social accounting matrices | underground economy | underground economy | price indices | price indices | shift share analyses | shift share analyses | energy | energy | determinants of growth | determinants of growth

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.471 Public Economics I (MIT) 14.471 Public Economics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers theory and evidence on government taxation policy. Topics include tax incidence, optimal tax theory, the effect of taxation on labor supply and savings, taxation and corporate behavior, and tax expenditure policy. This course covers theory and evidence on government taxation policy. Topics include tax incidence, optimal tax theory, the effect of taxation on labor supply and savings, taxation and corporate behavior, and tax expenditure policy.

Subjects

economic analysis | economic analysis | taxation | taxation | wealth | wealth | financial policy | financial policy | income | income | investment | investment | asset | asset | political economy | political economy | labor | labor | capital | capital | public policy | public policy | corporate finance | corporate finance | tax reform | tax reform | optimal commodity taxes | optimal commodity taxes | optimal corrective taxation | optimal corrective taxation | optimal stochastic taxes | optimal stochastic taxes | dynamic consistency issues | dynamic consistency issues | debt | debt | equity | equity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.41 Public Finance and Public Policy (MIT) 14.41 Public Finance and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Explores the role of government in the economy, applying tools of basic microeconomics to answer important policy questions such as government response to global warming, school choice by K-12 students, Social Security versus private retirement savings accounts, government versus private health insurance, setting income tax rates for individuals and corporations. Explores the role of government in the economy, applying tools of basic microeconomics to answer important policy questions such as government response to global warming, school choice by K-12 students, Social Security versus private retirement savings accounts, government versus private health insurance, setting income tax rates for individuals and corporations.

Subjects

social security | social security | insurance | insurance | taxation | taxation | welfare | welfare | public education | public education | economics of public goods | economics of public goods | corporate taxation | corporate taxation | taxation and savings | taxation and savings | tax reform | tax reform | redistribution | redistribution | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | political economy | political economy | externalities | externalities | health insurance | health insurance | disability insurance | disability insurance | workers compensation | workers compensation | public finance | public finance | public policy | public policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.15J Networks (MIT) 14.15J Networks (MIT)

Description

Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a Networks are ubiquitous in our modern society. The World Wide Web that links us to and enables information flows with the rest of the world is the most visible example. It is, however, only one of many networks within which we are situated. Our social life is organized around networks of friends and colleagues. These networks determine our information, influence our opinions, and shape our political attitudes. They also link us, often through important but weak ties, to everybody else in the United States and in the world. Economic and financial markets also look much more like networks than anonymous marketplaces. Firms interact with the same suppliers and customers and use Web-like supply chains. Financial linkages, both among banks and between consumers, companies and banks, also form a

Subjects

networks | networks | crowds | crowds | markets | markets | highly connected world | highly connected world | social networks | social networks | economic networks | economic networks | power networks | power networks | communication networks | communication networks | game theory | game theory | graph theory | graph theory | branching processes | branching processes | random graph models | random graph models | rich get richer phenomena | rich get richer phenomena | power laws | power laws | small worlds | small worlds | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | Erd?s-Renyi graphs | degree distributions | degree distributions | phase transitions | phase transitions | connectedness | connectedness | and giant component | and giant component | link analysis | link analysis | web search | web search | navigation | navigation | decentralized search | decentralized search | preferential attachment | preferential attachment | epidemics | epidemics | diffusion through networks | diffusion through networks | SIR | SIR | (susceptible | (susceptible | infected | infected | removed) | removed) | SIS | SIS | susceptible) | susceptible) | strategies | strategies | payoffs | payoffs | normal forms | normal forms | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | traffic networks | traffic networks | negative externalities | negative externalities | Braess' paradox | Braess' paradox | potential games | potential games | myopic behavior | myopic behavior | fictitious play | fictitious play | repeated games | repeated games | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma | cooperation | cooperation | perfect information | perfect information | imperfect information | imperfect information | positive externalities | positive externalities | strategic complements | strategic complements | path dependence | path dependence | diffusion of innovation | diffusion of innovation | contagion pheonomena | contagion pheonomena | Bayes's rule | Bayes's rule | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | Bayesian Nash equilibrium | first price auctions | first price auctions | second price auctions | second price auctions | social learning | social learning | Bayesian learning | Bayesian learning | copying | copying | herding | herding | herd behavior | herd behavior | informational cascades | informational cascades | decisions | decisions | social choice | social choice | Condorcet jury theorem | Condorcet jury theorem | political economy | political economy

License

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14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT) 14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them. 14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | public health and persuasion | incentives | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | educational quality | corruption | corruption | learning and social effects | learning and social effects | housing experiments | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | jury advocacy | causal inference | causal inference | internal and external threats | internal and external threats | clustering | clustering | standard errors | standard errors | randomization | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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