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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT) HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception.

Subjects

clinical case | clinical case | physiology | physiology | endocrinology | endocrinology | pathology | pathology | human reproduction | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproductive technology | reproduction | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | abortion | abortion | menopause | menopause | contraception | contraception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.551J Acoustics of Speech and Hearing (MIT) 6.551J Acoustics of Speech and Hearing (MIT)

Description

The Acoustics of Speech and Hearing is an H-Level graduate course that reviews the physical processes involved in the production, propagation and reception of human speech. Particular attention is paid to how the acoustics and mechanics of the speech and auditory system define what sounds we are capable of producing and what sounds we can sense. Areas of discussion include: the acoustic cues used in determining the direction of a sound source, the acoustic and mechanical mechanisms involved in speech production and the acoustic and mechanical mechanism used to transduce and analyze sounds in the ear. The Acoustics of Speech and Hearing is an H-Level graduate course that reviews the physical processes involved in the production, propagation and reception of human speech. Particular attention is paid to how the acoustics and mechanics of the speech and auditory system define what sounds we are capable of producing and what sounds we can sense. Areas of discussion include: the acoustic cues used in determining the direction of a sound source, the acoustic and mechanical mechanisms involved in speech production and the acoustic and mechanical mechanism used to transduce and analyze sounds in the ear.

Subjects

HST.714 | HST.714 | sound | sound | speech communication | speech communication | human anatomy | human anatomy | speech production | speech production | sound production | sound production | airflow | airflow | filtering | filtering | vocal tract | vocal tract | auditory physiology | auditory physiology | acoustical waves | acoustical waves | mechanical vibrations | mechanical vibrations | cochlear structures | cochlear structures | sound perception | sound perception | spatial hearing | spatial hearing | masking | masking | auditory frequency selectivity | auditory frequency selectivity | physical processes | physical processes | sound propagation | sound propagation | human speech | human speech | acoustics | acoustics | speech mechanics | speech mechanics | auditory system | auditory system | sound direction | sound direction | ear | ear | 6.551 | 6.551

License

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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15.764 The Theory of Operations Management (MIT) 15.764 The Theory of Operations Management (MIT)

Description

The doctoral seminar 15.764 focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models. This MIT OpenCourseWare site is dedicated to the memory of Bhuwan Singh, a member of the class. The doctoral seminar 15.764 focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models. This MIT OpenCourseWare site is dedicated to the memory of Bhuwan Singh, a member of the class.

Subjects

operations management | operations management | customer-focused operation systems | customer-focused operation systems | customer focus | customer focus | direct-to-consumer business model | direct-to-consumer business model | life-cycle management | life-cycle management | customer-driven operations | customer-driven operations | operational practices | operational practices | distribution systems | distribution systems | customer choice models | customer choice models | assemble-to-order production systems | assemble-to-order production systems | customer service centers | customer service centers | forecast evolution models | forecast evolution models | warehouse systems | warehouse systems | inventory policies | inventory policies | procurement | procurement | managing customer relationships | managing customer relationships | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | short life-cycle production management | short life-cycle production management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets. This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets.

Subjects

television | television | world markets | world markets | globalization | globalization | national cultures of production and reception | national cultures of production and reception | international cultural exchange | international cultural exchange | format trading | format trading | creativity of translation | creativity of translation | international circulation of light entertainment | international circulation of light entertainment | identity formation | identity formation | domestic content regulation strategies | domestic content regulation strategies | cultural imports | cultural imports | media imperialism | media imperialism | production industires | production industires | economics | economics | cultural translation | cultural translation | universal texts | universal texts | trade flows | trade flows | adaptation | adaptation | subtitling | subtitling | genre | genre | transparency | transparency | diasporic media | diasporic media | American culture | American culture | local reception | local reception | response | response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT) 21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT)

Description

Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production.

Subjects

Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; | Acting; | Acting | Acting | directing | directing | design | design | theater | theater | one-act | one-act | full length | full length | pre-rehearsal | pre-rehearsal | workshop | workshop | production | production | theater arts | theater arts | directed practice | directed practice | stagecraft | stagecraft | Dramashop | Dramashop | rehearsal | rehearsal | Anne Washburn | Anne Washburn | play | play | The Internationalist | The Internationalist | Sonenberg | Sonenberg | auditions | auditions | technical | technical

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT) HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered. This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered.

Subjects

clinical case | clinical case | physiology | physiology | endocrinology | endocrinology | pathology | pathology | human reproduction | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproductive technology | reproduction | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | abortion | abortion | menopause | menopause | contraception | contraception | reproductive biology | reproductive biology | menstrual cycle | menstrual cycle | fertility | fertility | impotence | impotence | anatomy | anatomy | sexual differentiation | sexual differentiation | sex | sex | pregnancy | pregnancy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.340J Introduction to the History of Technology (MIT) STS.340J Introduction to the History of Technology (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines. This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines.

Subjects

STS.340 | STS.340 | ESD.52 | ESD.52 | Geography | Geography | systems | systems | manufacturing | manufacturing | communication | communication | management | management | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | nature | nature | electrification | electrification | mass production | mass production | industrialization | industrialization | war | war | military | military | Bell System | Bell System | nuclear | nuclear | cybernetics | cybernetics | flight | flight | Wright Brothers | Wright Brothers | aerospace | aerospace | gender | gender | airline | airline | reproduction | reproduction | computing | computing | internet | internet | computer | computer | electronics | electronics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.615 Feminist Inquiry: Strategies for Effective Scholarship (MIT) WGS.615 Feminist Inquiry: Strategies for Effective Scholarship (MIT)

Description

This course investigates theories and practices of feminist inquiry across a range of disciplines. Feminist research involves rethinking disciplinary assumptions and methodologies, developing new understandings of what counts as knowledge, seeking alternative ways of understanding the origins of problems/issues, formulating new ways of asking questions and redefining the relationship between subjects and objects of study. What makes research distinctively feminist lies in the complex connections between epistemologies, methodologies and research methods. This course explores how these connections are formed in the traditional disciplines and raise questions about why they are inadequate and/or problematic for feminist inquiry and what, specifically, are the feminist critiques of these int This course investigates theories and practices of feminist inquiry across a range of disciplines. Feminist research involves rethinking disciplinary assumptions and methodologies, developing new understandings of what counts as knowledge, seeking alternative ways of understanding the origins of problems/issues, formulating new ways of asking questions and redefining the relationship between subjects and objects of study. What makes research distinctively feminist lies in the complex connections between epistemologies, methodologies and research methods. This course explores how these connections are formed in the traditional disciplines and raise questions about why they are inadequate and/or problematic for feminist inquiry and what, specifically, are the feminist critiques of these int

Subjects

feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | inquiry | inquiry | feminist inquiry | feminist inquiry | globalization | globalization | interdiscipline | interdiscipline | research | research | methods | methods | politics | politics | poststructuralism | poststructuralism | narration | narration | representation of the body | representation of the body | production | production | reproduction | reproduction | identity | identity | third wave feminism | third wave feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | study | science | technology | interdisciplinary field | social practice | history | philosophy | sociology | scientific institutions | knowledge | anthropology | feminism | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | queer theory | human culture | politics | theories | methods | reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

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Contemporary French culture in a global context Contemporary French culture in a global context

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Semester two 2009. This module looks at aspects of contemporary French culture in the context of an increasingly globalised culture and economy. In part, the module explores recent attempts to defend, redefine and interpret key aspects of French identity and culture as a means of negotiating ways of living in an era of globalisation and changing social structures. The module focuses on aspects of everyday life in France that are charged with political and economic significance, namely food/wine production and consumption and sport. These areas all raise questions about a range of issues: the national and the ‘local’ versus the global; constructions of Frenchness in opposition to America; th This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Semester two 2009. This module looks at aspects of contemporary French culture in the context of an increasingly globalised culture and economy. In part, the module explores recent attempts to defend, redefine and interpret key aspects of French identity and culture as a means of negotiating ways of living in an era of globalisation and changing social structures. The module focuses on aspects of everyday life in France that are charged with political and economic significance, namely food/wine production and consumption and sport. These areas all raise questions about a range of issues: the national and the ‘local’ versus the global; constructions of Frenchness in opposition to America; th

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | contemporary French culture | contemporary French culture | French identity | French identity | French culture | French culture | globalisation | globalisation | changing social structures | changing social structures | food production | food production | wine production | wine production | constructions of Frenchness | constructions of Frenchness | Mondovino | Mondovino

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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SP.691 Studies in Women's Life Narratives: Feminist Inquiry (MIT) SP.691 Studies in Women's Life Narratives: Feminist Inquiry (MIT)

Description

Feminist Inquiry starts with questions: What is feminism? What is feminist scholarship? Is feminist scholarship inherently interdisciplinary? Must feminist work interrogate disciplinarity? Must feminists collaborate? Our aim is to promote the development of feminist theory and methods by providing a forum for sharing, assessing, discussing and debating strategies used by feminist scholars to study topics such as gender and the body; sexualities; color and whiteness; migration, colonialism, and indigeneity. Feminist Inquiry starts with questions: What is feminism? What is feminist scholarship? Is feminist scholarship inherently interdisciplinary? Must feminist work interrogate disciplinarity? Must feminists collaborate? Our aim is to promote the development of feminist theory and methods by providing a forum for sharing, assessing, discussing and debating strategies used by feminist scholars to study topics such as gender and the body; sexualities; color and whiteness; migration, colonialism, and indigeneity.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | inquiry | inquiry | feminist inquiry | feminist inquiry | globalization | globalization | Islam | Islam | interdiscipline | interdiscipline | research | research | methods | methods | politics | politics | poststructuralism | poststructuralism | narration | narration | representation of the body | representation of the body | production | production | reproduction | reproduction | identity | identity | third wave feminism | third wave feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT) CMS.998 New Media Literacies (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and coll

Subjects

new media | new media | literacy | literacy | web 2.0 | web 2.0 | comparative media | comparative media | western literacy | western literacy | social turn | social turn | media production | media production | media use | media use | media interpretation | media interpretation | literacy production | literacy production

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT) 21G.056 Visual Histories: German Cinema 1945 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present. This course is an invitation to German film-making since the end of the Second World War. We investigate how German cinema captured the atmosphere of the immediate post-war years and discuss extensively major works of the "New German Cinema" of the Sixties and Seventies. We also look at examples of East Germany's film production and finally observe the very different roads German cinema has been taking from the 1990's into the present.

Subjects

German | German | Film | Film | Cinema | Cinema | Movies | Movies | History | History | Intercultural Analyses | Intercultural Analyses | Cinematic Tradition | Cinematic Tradition | Post-War | Post-War | Aesthetics | Aesthetics | German film-making | German film-making | Second World War | Second World War | German Cinema | German Cinema | post-war Germany | post-war Germany | New German Cinema | New German Cinema | East Germany | East Germany | film production | film production | film analysis | film analysis | German cinematic production | German cinematic production | German history | German history | Die Stunde Null | Die Stunde Null | Tr?mmerfilme | Tr?mmerfilme | Catastrophy | Catastrophy | visual histories | visual histories | West Germany | West Germany | America | America | Hollywood | Hollywood | East German Cinema | East German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | Post-unification German Cinema | WWII | WWII

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | study | science | technology | interdisciplinary field | social practice | history | philosophy | sociology | scientific institutions | knowledge | anthropology | feminism | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | queer theory | human culture | politics | theories | methods | reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | study | science | technology | interdisciplinary field | social practice | history | philosophy | sociology | scientific institutions | knowledge | anthropology | feminism | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | queer theory | human culture | politics | theories | methods | reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Studio Shot of Wright's Biscuits

Description

The wrappers for Wright's Biscuits have been photographed here by TurnersPhotographic of Newcastle. Wright?s Biscuits was a well known company in South Shields, South Tyneside. Set up as a maker of biscuits, they started out by supplying their stock to ships in 1790, but after a fall in demand, Wright's turned to making more up-market biscuits. Wright's Biscuit factory closed in 1973. Turner?s was established in Newcastle upon Tyne in the early 1900s. It was originally a chemists shop but in 1938 become a photographic dealer. Turners went on to become a prominent photographic and video production company in the North East of England. They had 3 shops in Newcastle city centre, in Pink Lane, Blackett Street and Eldon Square. Turner?s photographic business closed in the 1990s. Ref: TWAS:DT.TUR/2/898d (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk. To purchase a hi-res copy please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk quoting the title and reference number.

Subjects

turners | photography | 1900s | productioncompany | video | photographic | northeast | northeastofengland | newcastleupontyne | tyneandwear | museum | twam | tyneandweararchivesandmuseums | oldphotographs | wrightsbiscuits | biscuits | southshields | southtyneside | factory | mischief | ginger | pinklane | blackettstreet | eldonsquare | blackwhitephotos | studioshot | advertising | product | production | manufacturing | retail | consumerism | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | archives | documentation | artanddesign | illustration | drawing | letters | wrappers | containers | turnersphotographic | unitedkingdom | company | business | industry | supplier | ships | 1790 | closure | 1973 | upmarketbiscuits | curtain | fascinating | engaging | unusual | socialhistory | photographicandvideoproductioncompany | 1990s | displaybench | display | darkness | shadow | artificiallight | assortment | pile | products | food | child | content | happy | bliss | glimpse | interior

License

No known copyright restrictions

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of assisted reproductive technologies

Description

In this seminar for the Fertility and Reproduction Studies Group, Soraya Tremayne (Director of the FRSG) discusses 'Third party donation and the 'happy family' rhetoric in Iran'. 17 November 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | fertility | iran | Reproduction | anthropology | fertility | iran | Reproduction

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class.

Subjects

Men | Men | Women | Women | Gender | Gender | Feminists | Feminists | Feminist Theory | Feminist Theory | Prostitution | Prostitution | Morality | Morality | Chromosomes | Chromosomes | gender identification | gender identification | work and family | work and family | welfare reform | welfare reform | paternity | paternity | maternity | maternity | divorce | divorce | globalization of women's labor | globalization of women's labor | pornography | pornography | internet | internet | military service | military service | race | race | class | class | 2008 election campaigns | 2008 election campaigns | body image | body image | discrimination | discrimination | date rape | date rape | rape | rape | domestic violence | domestic violence | females in sports | females in sports | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | sexuality | sexuality | politics of consent | politics of consent | international economics | international economics | exile and pride | exile and pride | curious feminist | curious feminist | don't call us out of name | don't call us out of name | theorizing feminisms | theorizing feminisms | undoing the silence | undoing the silence | sneaker production | sneaker production | intersectionality | intersectionality | contextualize | contextualize | historicize | historicize

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.852 Manufacturing Systems Analysis (MIT) 2.852 Manufacturing Systems Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the following topics: Models of manufacturing systems, including transfer lines and flexible manufacturing systems; Calculation of performance measures, including throughput, in-process inventory, and meeting production commitments; Real-time control of scheduling; Effects of machine failure, set-ups, and other disruptions on system performance. This course deals with the following topics: Models of manufacturing systems, including transfer lines and flexible manufacturing systems; Calculation of performance measures, including throughput, in-process inventory, and meeting production commitments; Real-time control of scheduling; Effects of machine failure, set-ups, and other disruptions on system performance.

Subjects

models | models | manufacturing systems | manufacturing systems | transfer lines | transfer lines | flexible manufacturing systems | flexible manufacturing systems | Calculation of performance measures | Calculation of performance measures | throughput | throughput | in-process inventory | in-process inventory | meeting production commitments | meeting production commitments | Real-time control of scheduling | Real-time control of scheduling | Effects of machine failure | Effects of machine failure | disruptions on system performance | disruptions on system performance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT) 21W.780 Communicating in Technical Organizations (MIT)

Description

This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project. This class offers students an opportunity to experiment with various forms and practices of cellphone communication and, most importantly, to propose and develop a semester-long project using advanced A780 cellphones donated by Motorola along with access to J2ME™ source code for programming cellphone applications. Class size is limited. Students in small collaborative groups will propose, implement and report on a semester-long project.

Subjects

communication | communication | contemporary engineering and science professional | contemporary engineering and science professional | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | analyzing how composition and publication contribute to work management and knowledge production | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | writing specific kinds of documents in a clear style | communication as organizational process | communication as organizational process | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | electronic modes such as e-mail and the Internet | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | the informational and social roles of specific document forms | writing as collaboration | writing as collaboration | the writing process | the writing process | the elements of style | the elements of style | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | case studies | case studies | writing assignments | writing assignments | oral presentation | oral presentation | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics | methods of oral presentation | and communication ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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