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7.342 Developmental and Molecular Biology of Regeneration (MIT) 7.342 Developmental and Molecular Biology of Regeneration (MIT)

Description

How does a regenerating animal "know" what's missing? How are stem cells or differentiated cells used to create new tissues during regeneration? In this class we will take a comparative approach to explore this fascinating problem by critically examining classic and modern scientific literature about the developmental and molecular biology of regeneration. We will learn about conserved developmental pathways that are necessary for regeneration, and we will discuss the relevance of these findings for regenerative medicine. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highl How does a regenerating animal "know" what's missing? How are stem cells or differentiated cells used to create new tissues during regeneration? In this class we will take a comparative approach to explore this fascinating problem by critically examining classic and modern scientific literature about the developmental and molecular biology of regeneration. We will learn about conserved developmental pathways that are necessary for regeneration, and we will discuss the relevance of these findings for regenerative medicine. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highl

Subjects

Regeneration | Regeneration | blastema | blastema | embryo | embryo | progenitor | progenitor | stem cells | stem cells | differentiation | differentiation | dedifferentiation | dedifferentiation | hydra | hydra | morphallaxis | morphallaxis | limb | limb | organ | organ | zebrafish | zebrafish | homeostasis | homeostasis | self-renewal | self-renewal | regenerative medicine | regenerative medicine | differentitate | differentitate | regulate | regulate | salamander | salamander | catenin | catenin | newt | newt | liver | liver | pluriptent | pluriptent | fibroblast | fibroblast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 Biological Bases of Learning and Memory (MIT) 7.343 Biological Bases of Learning and Memory (MIT)

Description

How does the brain come to learn whether a stimulus is annoying, rewarding or neutral? How does remembering how to ride a bicycle differ from remembering scenes from a movie? In this course, students will explore the concept that learning and memory have a physical basis that can be observed as biochemical, physiological and/or morphological changes to neural tissue. Our goal will be to understand the strategies and techniques biologists use to search for the memory trace: the "holy grail" of modern neuroscience. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interact How does the brain come to learn whether a stimulus is annoying, rewarding or neutral? How does remembering how to ride a bicycle differ from remembering scenes from a movie? In this course, students will explore the concept that learning and memory have a physical basis that can be observed as biochemical, physiological and/or morphological changes to neural tissue. Our goal will be to understand the strategies and techniques biologists use to search for the memory trace: the "holy grail" of modern neuroscience. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interact

Subjects

learning | learning | memory | memory | neural tissue | neural tissue | neuronal connections | neuronal connections | synapse formation | synapse formation | synapse stabilization | synapse stabilization | synaptic transmission | synaptic transmission | synaptic plasticity | synaptic plasticity | neuromodulation | neuromodulation | experience-dependent circuit remodeling | experience-dependent circuit remodeling | neuroscience | neuroscience | pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms | pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms | neurotransmitter release | neurotransmitter release | activity-regulated genes | activity-regulated genes | hippocampus | hippocampus | long-term potentiation | long-term potentiation | long-term depression | long-term depression | cerebellar plasticity | cerebellar plasticity | Non-Associative | Non-Associative | Associative | Associative | cpg15 | cpg15 | experience-dependent synaptic plasticity | experience-dependent synaptic plasticity | perceptual learning | perceptual learning | observational learning | observational learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 Biological Bases of Learning and Memory (MIT)

Description

How does the brain come to learn whether a stimulus is annoying, rewarding or neutral? How does remembering how to ride a bicycle differ from remembering scenes from a movie? In this course, students will explore the concept that learning and memory have a physical basis that can be observed as biochemical, physiological and/or morphological changes to neural tissue. Our goal will be to understand the strategies and techniques biologists use to search for the memory trace: the "holy grail" of modern neuroscience. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interact

Subjects

learning | memory | neural tissue | neuronal connections | synapse formation | synapse stabilization | synaptic transmission | synaptic plasticity | neuromodulation | experience-dependent circuit remodeling | neuroscience | pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms | neurotransmitter release | activity-regulated genes | hippocampus | long-term potentiation | long-term depression | cerebellar plasticity | Non-Associative | Associative | cpg15 | experience-dependent synaptic plasticity | perceptual learning | observational learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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7.342 Developmental and Molecular Biology of Regeneration (MIT)

Description

How does a regenerating animal "know" what's missing? How are stem cells or differentiated cells used to create new tissues during regeneration? In this class we will take a comparative approach to explore this fascinating problem by critically examining classic and modern scientific literature about the developmental and molecular biology of regeneration. We will learn about conserved developmental pathways that are necessary for regeneration, and we will discuss the relevance of these findings for regenerative medicine. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highl

Subjects

Regeneration | blastema | embryo | progenitor | stem cells | differentiation | dedifferentiation | hydra | morphallaxis | limb | organ | zebrafish | homeostasis | self-renewal | regenerative medicine | differentitate | regulate | salamander | catenin | newt | liver | pluriptent | fibroblast

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

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