Searching for relationships : 123 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5

17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations. The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyzes the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States; defense; policy; institutional relationships; military; forces; civil; government; industry; science; military relations; politicians; defense contractors; officers; strategies; bureaucracy; armed services; contractors; defense scientists; sociology; organization; politics; political economy; congress; president; terror; war; homeland;intraservice; interservice; cargo; security | United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | president | president | terror | terror | war | war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of language. It examines different views on the nature of meaning, truth and reference, with special focus on the problem of understanding how linguistic communication works. This course is an introduction to the philosophy of language. It examines different views on the nature of meaning, truth and reference, with special focus on the problem of understanding how linguistic communication works.

Subjects

nature of meaning | reference | truth | and their relationships | nature of meaning | reference | truth | and their relationships | relationships between language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | relationships between language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | logic | logic | linguistics | linguistics | language | language | philosophy | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

MAS.965 Relational Machines (MIT) MAS.965 Relational Machines (MIT)

Description

This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building relational machines through a combination of studio-style design and critique along with lecture, lively discussion of course readings, and assignments. Insights from social psychology, human-computer interaction, and design will be examined, as well as how these ideas are manifest in a broad range of applications for software agents and robots. This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building relational machines through a combination of studio-style design and critique along with lecture, lively discussion of course readings, and assignments. Insights from social psychology, human-computer interaction, and design will be examined, as well as how these ideas are manifest in a broad range of applications for software agents and robots.

Subjects

relational machines | relational machines | emotional design | emotional design | technology | technology | human relationships | human relationships | emotional expression | emotional expression | representation and manipulation | representation and manipulation | measuring relationships and interactions | measuring relationships and interactions | assitive robotics for elderly | assitive robotics for elderly | robotic pets | robotic pets | robotic therapy | robotic therapy | language processing | language processing | machine teammates | machine teammates | collaboration | collaboration | interactive learning | interactive learning | tutorials | tutorials | wearable agent interaction | wearable agent interaction | ambient agent interaction | ambient agent interaction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-MAS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT) STS.320 Environmental Conflict and Social Change (MIT)

Description

This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world. This graduate-level class explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. It uses environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, this subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | complex interrelationships | complex interrelationships | humans | humans | natural environments | natural environments | conflict | conflict | access | access | land rights | land rights | hunting | hunting | fishing | fishing | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | scientific | scientific | popular | popular | knowledge | knowledge | biotechnology | biotechnology | hazardous waste | hazardous waste | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | environmental | environmental | stakes | stakes | forest | forest | agricultural | agricultural | marine | marine | urban | urban | cultural | cultural | historical | historical | power relationships | power relationships | local | local | national | national | international levels. nature | international levels. nature | European thought | European thought | theoretical paradigms | theoretical paradigms | ethnographic | ethnographic | East Africa | East Africa | South Asia | South Asia | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | Eastern Europe | Eastern Europe | North America | North America

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-STS.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Professional relationships with young people Professional relationships with young people

Description

In some people's eyes the development of relationships is a good end in itself, as it is in relationships that we express our humanity. Young people with few good-quality relationships in their lives often find that entering into informal relationships with adults who respect, accept, like and really listen to them is a new life experience. These relationships can offer the young people new perspectives on approaching, developing and managing quality relationships of their own. This free course, Professional relationships with young people, explores different approaches in developing relationships and working practices which can inform work with young people. First published on Tue, 16 Feb 2016 as Professional relationships with young people. To find out more visit The Open University's In some people's eyes the development of relationships is a good end in itself, as it is in relationships that we express our humanity. Young people with few good-quality relationships in their lives often find that entering into informal relationships with adults who respect, accept, like and really listen to them is a new life experience. These relationships can offer the young people new perspectives on approaching, developing and managing quality relationships of their own. This free course, Professional relationships with young people, explores different approaches in developing relationships and working practices which can inform work with young people. First published on Tue, 16 Feb 2016 as Professional relationships with young people. To find out more visit The Open University's

Subjects

Health | Sports & Psychology | Health | Sports & Psychology | Health | Health | Childhood & Youth | Childhood & Youth | E118_1 | E118_1 | work with young people | work with young people | youth work | youth work | informal education | informal education | developing relationships | developing relationships | voluntary relationships | voluntary relationships | young people | young people

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.391 Early Stage Capital (MIT) 15.391 Early Stage Capital (MIT)

Description

15.391 examines the elements of raising early stage capital, focusing on start-up ventures and the early stages of company development. This course also prepares entrepreneurs to make the best use of outside advisors, and to negotiate effective long-term relationships with funding sources. Working in teams, students interact with venture capitalists and other professionals throughout the semester. Disclaimer: The web sites for this course and the materials they offer are provided for educational use only. They are not a substitute for the advice of an attorney and no attorney-client relationship is created by using them. All materials are provided "as-is", without any express or implied warranties. 15.391 examines the elements of raising early stage capital, focusing on start-up ventures and the early stages of company development. This course also prepares entrepreneurs to make the best use of outside advisors, and to negotiate effective long-term relationships with funding sources. Working in teams, students interact with venture capitalists and other professionals throughout the semester. Disclaimer: The web sites for this course and the materials they offer are provided for educational use only. They are not a substitute for the advice of an attorney and no attorney-client relationship is created by using them. All materials are provided "as-is", without any express or implied warranties.

Subjects

raising venture capital | raising venture capital | starting business | starting business | structuring deals | structuring deals | valuating companies | valuating companies | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | venture capitalist | venture capitalist | finding early stage capital | finding early stage capital | negotiate investments | negotiate investments | new business laws | new business laws | financial simulations | financial simulations | build relationships | build relationships | start-up ventures | start-up ventures | company development | company development | using outside advisors | using outside advisors | funding sources | funding sources | term sheet | term sheet | VC | VC | entrepreneur | entrepreneur | pursuing seed money | pursuing seed money | biotechnology | biotechnology | biotech | biotech | angel financing | angel financing | first round money | first round money

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

This course examines how the presence of 1-, 2- and 3D defects and second phases control the mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys. It considers point, line and interfacial defects in the context of structural transformations including annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. In addition, it concentrates on structure-function relationships, and in particular how grain size, interstitial and substitutional solid solutions, and second-phase particles impact mechanical and other properties. Examples include microelectronic circuitry, magnetic memory and drug delivery applications. This course examines how the presence of 1-, 2- and 3D defects and second phases control the mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys. It considers point, line and interfacial defects in the context of structural transformations including annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. In addition, it concentrates on structure-function relationships, and in particular how grain size, interstitial and substitutional solid solutions, and second-phase particles impact mechanical and other properties. Examples include microelectronic circuitry, magnetic memory and drug delivery applications.

Subjects

1- | 2- and 3D defects | 1- | 2- and 3D defects | second phases | second phases | mechanical | electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys | mechanical | electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys | point | line and interfacial defects | point | line and interfacial defects | structural transformations | structural transformations | annealing | annealing | spinodal decomposition | spinodal decomposition | nucleation | nucleation | growth | growth | particle coarsening | particle coarsening | structure-function relationships | structure-function relationships | grain size | grain size | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | second-phase particles | second-phase particles | microelectronic circuitry | microelectronic circuitry | magnetic memory | magnetic memory | drug delivery applications | drug delivery applications | 3.40 | 3.40 | 22.71 | 22.71

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

Discusses structure-property relationships in metallic alloys selected to illustrate some basic concepts of physical metallurgy and alloy design. Fundamentals of annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. Concentrates on structure, structure formation, and structure-properties relationships. Also considers structural features: grain size, interstitial and substitutional solutes, precipitates, second-phase particles, and eutectoids. Examples from advanced structural alloys and low-dimensional alloys for magnetic recording media and integrated circuits. Discusses structure-property relationships in metallic alloys selected to illustrate some basic concepts of physical metallurgy and alloy design. Fundamentals of annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. Concentrates on structure, structure formation, and structure-properties relationships. Also considers structural features: grain size, interstitial and substitutional solutes, precipitates, second-phase particles, and eutectoids. Examples from advanced structural alloys and low-dimensional alloys for magnetic recording media and integrated circuits.

Subjects

metallic alloys | metallic alloys | physical metallurgy | physical metallurgy | alloy design | alloy design | annealing | annealing | spinodal decomposition | spinodal decomposition | nucleation | nucleation | particle coarsening | particle coarsening | structure | structure | structure formation | structure formation | structure-properties relationships | structure-properties relationships | structural features | structural features | 3.40 | 3.40 | 22.71 | 22.71

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.460 Defense Politics (MIT) 17.460 Defense Politics (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense. This course focuses on the institutional relationships that affect the raising, maintenance and use of military forces in the United States. It is about civil/military, government/industry, military/science and military service/military service relations.The course examines how politicians, defense contractors, and military officers determine the military might of the United States. It analyses the military strategies of the nation and the bureaucratic strategies of the armed services, contractors, and defense scientists. It offers a combination of military sociology, organizational politics, and the political economy of defense.

Subjects

United States | United States | defense | defense | policy | policy | institutional relationships | institutional relationships | military | military | forces | forces | civil | civil | government | government | industry | industry | science | science | military relations | military relations | politicians | politicians | defense contractors | defense contractors | officers | officers | strategies | strategies | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | armed services | armed services | contractors | contractors | defense scientists | defense scientists | sociology | sociology | organization | organization | politics | politics | political economy | political economy | congress | congress | presiden | presiden | terror; war | terror; war | homeland | homeland | intraservice | intraservice | interservice | interservice | cargo | cargo | security | security | terror | terror | war | war

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.131 Architectural Design, Level II: Material Essence: The Glass House (MIT) 4.131 Architectural Design, Level II: Material Essence: The Glass House (MIT)

Description

The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of b The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of b

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | materials | materials | relationships | relationships | interventions | interventions | physics | physics | place and space | place and space | wellesley campus | wellesley campus | thomson island | thomson island | glass | glass | structures | structures | advanced design | advanced design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | environmental control | environmental control | "art of technology" | "art of technology" | fabrication | fabrication | design from detailing | design from detailing | built form | built form | technical | technical | design investigation | design investigation | materiality | materiality | art of technology | art of technology | glasshouse | glasshouse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.123 Architectural Design, Level I: Perceptions and Processes (MIT) 4.123 Architectural Design, Level I: Perceptions and Processes (MIT)

Description

This studio explores the notion of in-between by engaging several relationships; the relationship between intervention and perception, between representation and notation and between the fixed and the temporal. In the Exactitude in Science, Jorge Luis Borges tells the perverse tale of the one to one scale map, where the desire for precision and power leads to the escalating production of larger and more accurate maps of the territory. For Jean Baudrillard, "The territory no longer precedes the map nor survives it. …it is the map that precedes the territory... and thus, it would be the territory whose shreds are slowly rotting across the map." The map or the territory, left to ruin-shredding across the 'other', beautifully captures the tension between reality and representati This studio explores the notion of in-between by engaging several relationships; the relationship between intervention and perception, between representation and notation and between the fixed and the temporal. In the Exactitude in Science, Jorge Luis Borges tells the perverse tale of the one to one scale map, where the desire for precision and power leads to the escalating production of larger and more accurate maps of the territory. For Jean Baudrillard, "The territory no longer precedes the map nor survives it. …it is the map that precedes the territory... and thus, it would be the territory whose shreds are slowly rotting across the map." The map or the territory, left to ruin-shredding across the 'other', beautifully captures the tension between reality and representati

Subjects

in-between | in-between | relationships | relationships | intervention and perception | intervention and perception | representation and notation | representation and notation | fixed and temporal | fixed and temporal | Borges | Borges | mapping | mapping | territory | territory | Baudrillard | Baudrillard | the 'other' | the 'other' | reality and representation | reality and representation | collective desire and territorial surface | collective desire and territorial surface | filter | filter | create | create | frame | frame | scale | scale | orient | orient | project | project | agency | agency | landscape | landscape | architecture | architecture | urbanism | urbanism | representation versus real | representation versus real | design | design | perception | perception | representation | representation | fixed | fixed | temporal | temporal | map | map | reality | reality | collective desire | collective desire | territorial surface | territorial surface

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT) 3.40J Physical Metallurgy (MIT)

Description

The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of materials with their properties, focusing primarily on metals. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals. The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of materials with their properties, focusing primarily on metals. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals.

Subjects

point | point | line and interfacial defects | line and interfacial defects | stereographic projection | stereographic projection | annealing | annealing | spinodal decomposition | spinodal decomposition | nucleation | nucleation | growth | growth | particle coarsening | particle coarsening | structure-function relationships | structure-function relationships | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | interstitial and substitutional solid solutions | processing and structure of metals | processing and structure of metals | strength | strength | stiffness | stiffness | and ductility | and ductility | crystallography | crystallography | phase transformations | phase transformations | microstructural evolution | microstructural evolution | steel | steel | aluminum | aluminum

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT) 9.916 Special Topics: Social Animals (MIT)

Description

Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

social animals | social animals | social | social | animals | animals | society | society | human society | human society | members | members | community | community | living together | living together | mutual benefit | mutual benefit | people | people | region | region | country | country | world | world | whole | whole | association | association | body | body | individuals | individuals | functional interdependence | functional interdependence | national or cultural identity | national or cultural identity | social solidarity | social solidarity | language or hierarchical organization | language or hierarchical organization | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | patterns of relationships between individuals sharing a distinctive culture and institutions | groups | groups | economic | economic | social or industrial infrastructure | social or industrial infrastructure | made up of a varied collection of individuals | made up of a varied collection of individuals | ethnic groups | ethnic groups | nation state | nation state | broader cultural group | broader cultural group | organized voluntary association of people for religious | organized voluntary association of people for religious | benevolent | benevolent | cultural | cultural | scientific | scientific | political | political | patriotic | patriotic | or other purposes. | or other purposes.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-9.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.520 Molecular Aspects of Chemical Engineering (MIT) 10.520 Molecular Aspects of Chemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This class covers molecular-level engineering and analysis of chemical processes. The use of chemical bonding, reactivity, and other key concepts in the design and tailoring of organic systems are discussed in this class. Specific class topics include application and development of structure-property relationships, and descriptions of the chemical forces and structural factors that govern supramolecular and interfacial phenomena for molecular and polymeric systems. This class covers molecular-level engineering and analysis of chemical processes. The use of chemical bonding, reactivity, and other key concepts in the design and tailoring of organic systems are discussed in this class. Specific class topics include application and development of structure-property relationships, and descriptions of the chemical forces and structural factors that govern supramolecular and interfacial phenomena for molecular and polymeric systems.

Subjects

molecular-level engineering | molecular-level engineering | analysis of chemical processes | analysis of chemical processes | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | reactivity | reactivity | design of organic systems | design of organic systems | tailoring of organic systems | tailoring of organic systems | application and development of structure-property relationships | application and development of structure-property relationships | descriptions of the chemical forces and structural factors that govern supramolecular and interfacial phenomena for molecular and polymeric systems | descriptions of the chemical forces and structural factors that govern supramolecular and interfacial phenomena for molecular and polymeric systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-10.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.764 The Theory of Operations Management (MIT) 15.764 The Theory of Operations Management (MIT)

Description

The doctoral seminar 15.764 focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models. This MIT OpenCourseWare site is dedicated to the memory of Bhuwan Singh, a member of the class. The doctoral seminar 15.764 focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models. This MIT OpenCourseWare site is dedicated to the memory of Bhuwan Singh, a member of the class.

Subjects

operations management | operations management | customer-focused operation systems | customer-focused operation systems | customer focus | customer focus | direct-to-consumer business model | direct-to-consumer business model | life-cycle management | life-cycle management | customer-driven operations | customer-driven operations | operational practices | operational practices | distribution systems | distribution systems | customer choice models | customer choice models | assemble-to-order production systems | assemble-to-order production systems | customer service centers | customer service centers | forecast evolution models | forecast evolution models | warehouse systems | warehouse systems | inventory policies | inventory policies | procurement | procurement | managing customer relationships | managing customer relationships | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | short life-cycle production management | short life-cycle production management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.990 Architecture and Communication in Organizations (MIT) 15.990 Architecture and Communication in Organizations (MIT)

Description

While no businesses succeed based on their architecture or space design, many fail as a result of inattention to the power of spatial relationships. This course demonstrates through live case studies with managers and architects the value of strategic space planning and decision making in relation to business needs. The course presents conceptual frameworks for thinking about architecture, communication and organizations. This course is offered during the Sloan Innovation Period (SIP), which is a one-week period at the MIT Sloan School of Management that occurs midway through each semester. While no businesses succeed based on their architecture or space design, many fail as a result of inattention to the power of spatial relationships. This course demonstrates through live case studies with managers and architects the value of strategic space planning and decision making in relation to business needs. The course presents conceptual frameworks for thinking about architecture, communication and organizations. This course is offered during the Sloan Innovation Period (SIP), which is a one-week period at the MIT Sloan School of Management that occurs midway through each semester.

Subjects

using space | using space | space design for business | space design for business | space planning | space planning | office buildings | office buildings | architectural design | architectural design | business communication | business communication | distributed work | distributed work | workplace design | workplace design | work stations | work stations | communication | communication | team work | team work | architecture of knowledge | architecture of knowledge | offices | offices | cubicles | cubicles | space design | space design | office space | office space | spatial relationships | spatial relationships | live case studies | live case studies | architects | architects | managers | managers | strategic space planning | strategic space planning | organizations | organizations | knowledge architecture | knowledge architecture | architecture | architecture | business administration | business administration | management | management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.245J Power: Interpersonal, Organizational and Global Dimensions (MIT) 21A.245J Power: Interpersonal, Organizational and Global Dimensions (MIT)

Description

Using examples from anthropology and sociology alongside classical and contemporary social theory, this course explores the nature of dominant and subordinate relationships, types of legitimate authority, and practices of resistance. The course also examines how we are influenced in subtle ways by the people around us, who makes controlling decisions in the family, how people get ahead at work, and whether democracies, in fact, reflect the "will of the people." Using examples from anthropology and sociology alongside classical and contemporary social theory, this course explores the nature of dominant and subordinate relationships, types of legitimate authority, and practices of resistance. The course also examines how we are influenced in subtle ways by the people around us, who makes controlling decisions in the family, how people get ahead at work, and whether democracies, in fact, reflect the "will of the people."

Subjects

21A.245 | 21A.245 | 17.045 | 17.045 | Anthropology | Anthropology | power | power | interpersonal | interpersonal | organizational | organizational | global | global | dimensions | dimensions | sociology classical | sociology classical | contemporary | contemporary | social theory | social theory | dominant | dominant | subordinate | subordinate | relationships | relationships | legitimate authority | legitimate authority | resistance | resistance | control | control | decisions | decisions | family | family | work | work | democracies | democracies | will | will | people | people

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT) 21A.225J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice (MIT)

Description

This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state. This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | political | political | violence | violence | human rights | human rights | freedom | freedom | peace | peace | justice | justice | citizens | citizens | state | state | historical debates | historical debates | cultural | cultural | natural | natural | western European | western European | moral values | moral values | differences | differences | culture | culture | religion | religion | gender | gender | relationships | relationships | individuals | individuals | collective groups | collective groups | ethnography | ethnography | case studies | case studies | conflict | conflict | globe | globe | war crimes tribunals | war crimes tribunals | truth commissions | truth commissions | individual | individual | collective | collective | traumas | traumas | rule of law | rule of law | representative governance | representative governance | 21A.225 | 21A.225 | SP.621 | SP.621

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.420 Literary Studies: The Legacy of England (MIT) 21L.420 Literary Studies: The Legacy of England (MIT)

Description

Topic: The English sense of humor. This course examines English literature across genre and historical periods. It is designed for students who want to study English literature or writing in some depth, or to know more about English literary culture and history. Students will also learn about the relationships between literary themes, forms, and conventions and the times in which they were produced. Materials include: Medieval tales, riddles, and character sketches; Renaissance lyrics and a play, 18th-century satires in words and images, 19th century irony, modern stories and film. Topic: The English sense of humor. This course examines English literature across genre and historical periods. It is designed for students who want to study English literature or writing in some depth, or to know more about English literary culture and history. Students will also learn about the relationships between literary themes, forms, and conventions and the times in which they were produced. Materials include: Medieval tales, riddles, and character sketches; Renaissance lyrics and a play, 18th-century satires in words and images, 19th century irony, modern stories and film.

Subjects

English literature across genre and historical period | English literature across genre and historical period | writing | writing | relationships between literary themes | forms | and conventions | relationships between literary themes | forms | and conventions | Renaissance lyrics | Enlightenment satire | and modernist short stories | Renaissance lyrics | Enlightenment satire | and modernist short stories

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT) 9.75J Psychology of Gender (MIT)

Description

We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces. We will examine current research and theory regarding the validity and utility of commonly accepted gender differences in many realms. Topics include: gender differences in cognitive abilities; the social construction of gender; developmental, family, educational and medical influences; and political and economic forces.

Subjects

individual | individual | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | gender | gender | gender development | gender development | gender differences | gender differences | cognition | cognition | emotion | emotion | gender stereotypes | gender stereotypes | mental health | mental health | sexuality | sexuality | close relationships | close relationships | work | work | 9.75 | 9.75

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Folk Psychology, the Reactive Attitudes and Responsibility

Description

In this talk we first argue that the reactive attitudes originate in very fast non-voluntary processes involving constant facial feedback. In the second part we examine the supposed constitutive relation between the reactive attitudes and responsibility. This talk explores the connections between the folk psychological project of interpretation, the reactive attitudes and responsibility. The first section argues that the reactive attitudes originate in very fast and to a significant extent, non-voluntary processes involving constant facial feedback. These processes allow for smooth interaction between participants and are important to the interpretive practices that ground intimate relationships as well as to a great many less intense interactions. We will examine cases of facial paralysi Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social relationships | facial paralysis | interpretation | psychopaths | facial feedback | Moebius Syndrome | reactive attitudes | Botox | social relationships | facial paralysis | interpretation | psychopaths | facial feedback | Moebius Syndrome | reactive attitudes | Botox

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129191/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Love on the rocks? Love on the rocks?

Description

Professor Moran was at the University to open the inaugural seminar series for the Centre for British Politics. Professor Moran was at the University to open the inaugural seminar series for the Centre for British Politics. How badly has the recession affected the relationship between political parties and business? Expert in the field - Professor Mick Moran - assesses the cracks in the relationship and how the crisis will affect it in the future. Professor Moran was at the University to open the inaugural seminar series for the Centre for British Politics. How badly has the recession affected the relationship between political parties and business? Expert in the field - Professor Mick Moran - assesses the cracks in the relationship and how the crisis will affect it in the future. Professor Moran was at the University to open the inaugural seminar series for the Centre for British Politics.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | relationships | relationships | recession | recession | politics | politics | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

ES.S60 The Art and Science of Happiness (MIT) ES.S60 The Art and Science of Happiness (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at current theories on happiness and positive psychology as well as practical implications of those theories for our own lives. It explores the concept of happiness, different cultural definitions of happiness, and the connection between happiness, optimism, and meaning. Also explored are practical strategies for creating more opportunities for happiness in our lives and for learning how to deal more effectively with sources of unhappiness. This seminar is part of the Experimental Study Group at MIT. This seminar looks at current theories on happiness and positive psychology as well as practical implications of those theories for our own lives. It explores the concept of happiness, different cultural definitions of happiness, and the connection between happiness, optimism, and meaning. Also explored are practical strategies for creating more opportunities for happiness in our lives and for learning how to deal more effectively with sources of unhappiness. This seminar is part of the Experimental Study Group at MIT.

Subjects

happiness | happiness | positive psychology | positive psychology | optimism | optimism | gratitude | gratitude | pleasure | pleasure | cognitive style | cognitive style | pessimism | pessimism | sadness | sadness | depression | depression | unhappiness | unhappiness | suffering | suffering | relationships | relationships | wellness | wellness | flow | flow | values | values | meaning | meaning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-ES.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata