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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This is a half-semester course which covers the topics in Microeconomic Theory that everybody with a Ph.D. from MIT Economics Department should know but that have not yet been covered in the Micro sequence. Hence, it covers several unrelated topics. The topics come from three general areas: Decision Theory, Game Theory, and Behaviorla Economics.  I will try my best to put them in a coherent narrative, but there will be inherent jumps from topic to topic. This is a half-semester course which covers the topics in Microeconomic Theory that everybody with a Ph.D. from MIT Economics Department should know but that have not yet been covered in the Micro sequence. Hence, it covers several unrelated topics. The topics come from three general areas: Decision Theory, Game Theory, and Behaviorla Economics.  I will try my best to put them in a coherent narrative, but there will be inherent jumps from topic to topic.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | reputation formation | reputation formation | rationalizability | rationalizability | game theory | game theory | behavioral economics | behavioral economics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | environment | environment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | enviroment | enviroment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT) 14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This is a half-semester course which covers the topics in Microeconomic Theory that everybody with a Ph.D. from MIT Economics Department should know but that have not yet been covered in the Micro sequence. Hence, it covers several unrelated topics. The topics come from three general areas: Decision Theory, Game Theory, and Behaviorla Economics.  I will try my best to put them in a coherent narrative, but there will be inherent jumps from topic to topic. This is a half-semester course which covers the topics in Microeconomic Theory that everybody with a Ph.D. from MIT Economics Department should know but that have not yet been covered in the Micro sequence. Hence, it covers several unrelated topics. The topics come from three general areas: Decision Theory, Game Theory, and Behaviorla Economics.  I will try my best to put them in a coherent narrative, but there will be inherent jumps from topic to topic.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | reputation formation | reputation formation | rationalizability | rationalizability | game theory | game theory | behavioral economics | behavioral economics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.025 Game Theory for Strategic Advantage (MIT) 15.025 Game Theory for Strategic Advantage (MIT)

Description

This course develops and applies principles of game theory relevant to managers' strategic decisions. Topics include how to reason about strategies and opponents; strategic commitment, reputation, and "irrational" actions; brinkmanship and negotiation; auctions; and the design of markets and contests. Applications to a variety of business decisions that arise in different industries, both within and outside the firm. This course develops and applies principles of game theory relevant to managers' strategic decisions. Topics include how to reason about strategies and opponents; strategic commitment, reputation, and "irrational" actions; brinkmanship and negotiation; auctions; and the design of markets and contests. Applications to a variety of business decisions that arise in different industries, both within and outside the firm.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | strategic advantage | strategic advantage | multi-person decision problem | multi-person decision problem | strategies and opponents | strategies and opponents | strategic commitment | strategic commitment | reputation | reputation | "irrational" actions | "irrational" actions | brinkmanship | brinkmanship | negotiation | negotiation | auctions | auctions | market design | market design | contests | contests | long-run relationships | long-run relationships | communication | communication | credibility | credibility | structures | structures | hidden information | hidden information | limits | limits | Preemptive Investment | Preemptive Investment | Audition Game | Audition Game | Location Game | Location Game | Penalty Shots | Penalty Shots | Splitting the Dollar | Splitting the Dollar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | population theory | technology | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | finance | property rights | trade | reputation | history | culture | political science | enviroment | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | interventions | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Improve your Online Presence (2010)

Description

Authors:  Travis Noakes What online search shows about you, can be an important aid to your CV. Clicked 539 times. Last clicked 07/09/2014 - 08:34. Teaching & Learning Context:  <p>For my first tutoring session in the &quot;Online Media Production&quot; course, I prepared a presentation on the importance of students using their practical internet work to improve their online reputation. This is highly relevant in Film and Media, where examples of a student's practical work are critical when searching for employment in industry.</p> <p><a href="http://www.flickr.c

Subjects

Film and Media Studies | Humanities | Other | English | Post-secondary | brand | management | online | reputation | web2.0 | you

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/za/

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Lesson Plan: Who am I? My digital footprint

Description

This session primarily aims to give to the learners a space for reflection around their digital identity and the trails they leave in the cyberspace. It also aims to introduce the idea of the level of control learners can have on what is on the web about them and how to deal with the uncertainty.

Subjects

Digital literacy | Digital Identity | Online reputation | Information Literacy | Lesson Plan | Higher Education | Digital Footprint | Cybersecurity | Employability Skills | Birkbeck Library | Pedagogical Patterns Collector | Learning Designer | Technologies | J000

License

Attribution 3.0 Unported Attribution 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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14.123 Microeconomic Theory III (MIT)

Description

This is a half-semester course which covers the topics in Microeconomic Theory that everybody with a Ph.D. from MIT Economics Department should know but that have not yet been covered in the Micro sequence. Hence, it covers several unrelated topics. The topics come from three general areas: Decision Theory, Game Theory, and Behaviorla Economics.  I will try my best to put them in a coherent narrative, but there will be inherent jumps from topic to topic.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | reputation formation | rationalizability | game theory | behavioral economics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | population theory | technology | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | finance | property rights | trade | reputation | history | culture | political science | enviroment | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | interventions | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subjects

development economics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | population theory | technology | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | finance | property rights | trade | reputation | history | culture | political science | environment | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | interventions | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analysis | endogenous growth | coordintation | incomplete markets | technolgy | distribution | employment | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | demographics | complementarities | amplification | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | morris | shin | global games | policy | price | aggregation | social learning | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | savings | utility | aiyagari | steady state | krusell | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | fluctuations | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | reputation | information | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.025 Game Theory for Strategic Advantage (MIT)

Description

This course develops and applies principles of game theory relevant to managers' strategic decisions. Topics include how to reason about strategies and opponents; strategic commitment, reputation, and "irrational" actions; brinkmanship and negotiation; auctions; and the design of markets and contests. Applications to a variety of business decisions that arise in different industries, both within and outside the firm.

Subjects

game theory | strategic advantage | multi-person decision problem | strategies and opponents | strategic commitment | reputation | "irrational" actions | brinkmanship | negotiation | auctions | market design | contests | long-run relationships | communication | credibility | structures | hidden information | limits | Preemptive Investment | Audition Game | Location Game | Penalty Shots | Splitting the Dollar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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