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7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT) 7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains (proteins), determine their three-dimensional conformation. Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure, the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells, folding intermediates aggregation and competing off-pathway reactions, and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro. Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases, protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry, and diseases found associated with protein folding defects. This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains (proteins), determine their three-dimensional conformation. Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure, the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells, folding intermediates aggregation and competing off-pathway reactions, and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro. Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases, protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry, and diseases found associated with protein folding defects.

Subjects

amino acid sequence | amino acid sequence | polypeptide chains | polypeptide chains | sequence determinants | sequence determinants | folding | folding | synthesized polypeptide chains within cells | synthesized polypeptide chains within cells | unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro | unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro | folding intermediates aggregation | folding intermediates aggregation | competing off-pathway reactions | competing off-pathway reactions | chaperonins | chaperonins | isomerases | isomerases | helper proteins | helper proteins | protein recovery problems | protein recovery problems | biotechnology industry | biotechnology industry | protein folding defects | protein folding defects | 3-D conformation | 3-D conformation | globular proteins | globular proteins | fibrous proteins | fibrous proteins | kinetics | kinetics | in vitro refolding | in vitro refolding | pathways | pathways | in vivo folding | in vivo folding | synthesized proteins | synthesized proteins | aggregation | aggregation | protein misfolding | protein misfolding | human disease | human disease | protein folding | protein folding | genome sequences | genome sequences | 7.88 | 7.88 | 5.48 | 5.48 | 7.24 | 7.24 | 10.543 | 10.543

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18.100B Analysis I (MIT) 18.100B Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations. MIT students may choose to take one of the two versions of 18.100. Option A chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with the real line. Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations. MIT students may choose to take one of the two versions of 18.100. Option A chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with the real line.

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Reimann integral | Reimann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space | sequences of functions | sequences of functions | series of functions | series of functions | applications | applications | real variable | real variable | metric space | metric space | sets | sets | theorems | theorems | differentiate | differentiate | differentiable | differentiable | converge | converge | uniform | uniform | 18.100 | 18.100

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7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT) 7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to computational biology emphasizing the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence and structural analysis; it also includes an introduction to the analysis of complex biological systems. Topics covered in the course include principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction and network modeling, as well as currently emerging research areas. This course is an introduction to computational biology emphasizing the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence and structural analysis; it also includes an introduction to the analysis of complex biological systems. Topics covered in the course include principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction and network modeling, as well as currently emerging research areas.

Subjects

7.91 | 7.91 | 20.490 | 20.490 | 20.390 | 20.390 | 7.36 | 7.36 | 6.802 | 6.802 | 6.874 | 6.874 | HST.506 | HST.506 | computational biology | computational biology | systems biology | systems biology | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | proteomics | proteomics | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | protein folding | protein folding | structure prediction | structure prediction | network modeling | network modeling | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | pairwise sequence comparisons | pairwise sequence comparisons | ncbi | ncbi | blast | blast | protein structure | protein structure | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | genome sequencing | genome sequencing | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | x-ray crystallography | x-ray crystallography | NMR | NMR | homologs | homologs | ab initio structure prediction | ab initio structure prediction | DNA microarrays | DNA microarrays | clustering | clustering | proteome | proteome | computational annotation | computational annotation

License

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7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT) 7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

Serving as an introduction to computational biology, this course emphasizes the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis, structural analysis, and the analysis of complex biological systems. The principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction, and network modeling are covered. Students are also exposed to currently emerging research areas in the fields of computational and systems biology. Serving as an introduction to computational biology, this course emphasizes the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis, structural analysis, and the analysis of complex biological systems. The principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction, and network modeling are covered. Students are also exposed to currently emerging research areas in the fields of computational and systems biology.

Subjects

computational biology | computational biology | systems biology | systems biology | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | proteomics | proteomics | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | protein folding | protein folding | structure prediction | structure prediction | network modeling | network modeling | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | pairwise sequence comparisons | pairwise sequence comparisons | ncbi | ncbi | blast | blast | protein structure | protein structure | dynamic programming | dynamic programming | genome sequencing | genome sequencing | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | x-ray crystallography | x-ray crystallography | NMR | NMR | homologs | homologs | ab initio structure prediction | ab initio structure prediction | DNA microarrays | DNA microarrays | clustering | clustering | proteome | proteome | computational annotation | computational annotation | BE.490J | BE.490J | 7.91 | 7.91 | 7.36 | 7.36 | BE.490 | BE.490 | 20.490 | 20.490

License

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18.100A Analysis I (MIT) 18.100A Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I (18.100) in its various versions covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: continuity, differentiability, some form of the Riemann integral, sequences and series of numbers and functions, uniform convergence with applications to interchange of limit operations, some point-set topology, including some work in Euclidean n-space. MIT students may choose to take one of three versions of 18.100: Option A (18.100A) chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B (18.100B) is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis from the beginning on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with analysis on the real line, saving for the last weeks work in 2-space (the pla Analysis I (18.100) in its various versions covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: continuity, differentiability, some form of the Riemann integral, sequences and series of numbers and functions, uniform convergence with applications to interchange of limit operations, some point-set topology, including some work in Euclidean n-space. MIT students may choose to take one of three versions of 18.100: Option A (18.100A) chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B (18.100B) is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis from the beginning on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with analysis on the real line, saving for the last weeks work in 2-space (the pla

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Riemann integral | Riemann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space

License

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18.100B Analysis I (MIT) 18.100B Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, and interchange of limit operations. Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, and interchange of limit operations.

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Riemann integral | Riemann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space

License

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6.895 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT) 6.895 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include:Genomes: Biological Sequence Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, Gene Finding, RNA Folding, Sequence Alignment, Genome Assembly.Networks: Gene Expression Analysis, Regulatory Motifs, Graph Algorithms, Scale-free Networks, Network Motifs, Network Evolution.Evolution: Comparative Genomics, Phylogenetics, Genome Duplication, Genome Rearrangements, Evolutionary Theory, Rapid Evolution. This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include:Genomes: Biological Sequence Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, Gene Finding, RNA Folding, Sequence Alignment, Genome Assembly.Networks: Gene Expression Analysis, Regulatory Motifs, Graph Algorithms, Scale-free Networks, Network Motifs, Network Evolution.Evolution: Comparative Genomics, Phylogenetics, Genome Duplication, Genome Rearrangements, Evolutionary Theory, Rapid Evolution.

Subjects

Genomes: Biological sequence analysis | Genomes: Biological sequence analysis | hidden Markov models | hidden Markov models | gene finding | gene finding | RNA folding | RNA folding | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | Networks: Gene expression analysis | Networks: Gene expression analysis | regulatory motifs | regulatory motifs | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | scale-free networks | scale-free networks | network motifs | network motifs | network evolution | network evolution | Evolution: Comparative genomics | Evolution: Comparative genomics | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | genome duplication | genome duplication | genome rearrangements | genome rearrangements | evolutionary theory | evolutionary theory | rapid evolution | rapid evolution

License

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6.047 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT) 6.047 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution

Subjects

computational biology | computational biology | algorithms | algorithms | machine learning | machine learning | biology | biology | biological datasets | biological datasets | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | genomes | genomes | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | network motifs | network motifs | network evolution | network evolution | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | python | python | probability | probability | statistics | statistics | entropy | entropy | information | information

License

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6.096 Algorithms for Computational Biology (MIT) 6.096 Algorithms for Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and addresses several algorithmic challenges in computational biology. The principles of algorithmic design for biological datasets are studied and existing algorithms analyzed for application to real datasets. Topics covered include: biological sequence analysis, gene identification, regulatory motif discovery, genome assembly, genome duplication and rearrangements, evolutionary theory, clustering algorithms, and scale-free networks. This course is offered to undergraduates and addresses several algorithmic challenges in computational biology. The principles of algorithmic design for biological datasets are studied and existing algorithms analyzed for application to real datasets. Topics covered include: biological sequence analysis, gene identification, regulatory motif discovery, genome assembly, genome duplication and rearrangements, evolutionary theory, clustering algorithms, and scale-free networks.

Subjects

biological sequence analysis | biological sequence analysis | gene finding | gene finding | motif discovery | motif discovery | RNA folding | RNA folding | global and local sequence alignment | global and local sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | genome duplication | genome duplication | genome rearrangements | genome rearrangements | evolutionary theory | evolutionary theory | gene expression | gene expression | clustering algorithms | clustering algorithms | scale-free networks | scale-free networks | machine learning applications | machine learning applications

License

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7.90J Computational Functional Genomics (MIT) 7.90J Computational Functional Genomics (MIT)

Description

The course focuses on casting contemporary problems in systems biology and functional genomics in computational terms and providing appropriate tools and methods to solve them. Topics include genome structure and function, transcriptional regulation, and stem cell biology in particular; measurement technologies such as microarrays (expression, protein-DNA interactions, chromatin structure); statistical data analysis, predictive and causal inference, and experiment design. The emphasis is on coupling problem structures (biological questions) with appropriate computational approaches. The course focuses on casting contemporary problems in systems biology and functional genomics in computational terms and providing appropriate tools and methods to solve them. Topics include genome structure and function, transcriptional regulation, and stem cell biology in particular; measurement technologies such as microarrays (expression, protein-DNA interactions, chromatin structure); statistical data analysis, predictive and causal inference, and experiment design. The emphasis is on coupling problem structures (biological questions) with appropriate computational approaches.

Subjects

systems biology | systems biology | genome structure | genome structure | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | transcription | transcription | stem cell | stem cell | biology | biology | microarray | microarray | gene expression | gene expression | statistical data analysis | statistical data analysis | chromatin | chromatin | gene sequence | gene sequence | genomic sequence | genomic sequence | motif | motif | protein | protein | error model | error model | diagnostic | diagnostic | gene clustering | gene clustering | phenotype | phenotype | clustering | clustering | proteome | proteome | 7.90 | 7.90 | 6.874 | 6.874

License

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18.100A Introduction to Analysis (MIT) 18.100A Introduction to Analysis (MIT)

Description

Analysis I (18.100) in its various versions covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: continuity, differentiability, some form of the Riemann integral, sequences and series of numbers and functions, uniform convergence with applications to interchange of limit operations, some point-set topology, including some work in Euclidean n-space. MIT students may choose to take one of three versions of 18.100: Option A (18.100A) chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B (18.100B) is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis from the beginning on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with analysis on the real line, saving for the last weeks work in 2-space (the pla Analysis I (18.100) in its various versions covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: continuity, differentiability, some form of the Riemann integral, sequences and series of numbers and functions, uniform convergence with applications to interchange of limit operations, some point-set topology, including some work in Euclidean n-space. MIT students may choose to take one of three versions of 18.100: Option A (18.100A) chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B (18.100B) is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis from the beginning on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with analysis on the real line, saving for the last weeks work in 2-space (the pla

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | estimations | estimations | limit of a sequence | limit of a sequence | limit theorems | limit theorems | subsequences | subsequences | cluster points | cluster points | infinite series | infinite series | power series | power series | local and global properties | local and global properties | continuity | continuity | intermediate-value theorem | intermediate-value theorem | convexity | convexity | integrability | integrability | Riemann integral | Riemann integral | calculus | calculus | convergence | convergence | Gamma function | Gamma function | Stirling | Stirling | quantifiers and negation | quantifiers and negation | Leibniz | Leibniz | Fubini | Fubini | improper integrals | improper integrals | Lebesgue integral | Lebesgue integral | mathematical proofs | mathematical proofs | differentiation | differentiation | integration | integration

License

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18.100B Analysis I (MIT) 18.100B Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: metric spaces, convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations. Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: metric spaces, convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations.

Subjects

mathematical analysis | mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | convergence of series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Riemann integral | Riemann integral | sequences and series of functions | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | construction of proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space

License

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6.047 Computational Biology (MIT) 6.047 Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

This course covers the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology combining theory with practice. We cover both foundational topics in computational biology, and current research frontiers. We study fundamental techniques, recent advances in the field, and work directly with current large-scale biological datasets. This course covers the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology combining theory with practice. We cover both foundational topics in computational biology, and current research frontiers. We study fundamental techniques, recent advances in the field, and work directly with current large-scale biological datasets.

Subjects

Genomes | Genomes | Networks | Networks | Evolution | Evolution | computational biology | computational biology | genomics | genomics | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | epigenomics | epigenomics | functional genomics | motifs | functional genomics | motifs | phylogenomics | phylogenomics | personal genomics | personal genomics | algorithms | algorithms | machine learning | machine learning | biology | biology | biological datasets | biological datasets | proteomics | proteomics | sequence analysis | sequence analysis | sequence alignment | sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | network motifs | network motifs | network evolution | network evolution | graph algorithms | graph algorithms | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | python | python | probability | probability | statistics | statistics | entropy | entropy | information | information

License

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7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

Serving as an introduction to computational biology, this course emphasizes the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis, structural analysis, and the analysis of complex biological systems. The principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction, and network modeling are covered. Students are also exposed to currently emerging research areas in the fields of computational and systems biology.

Subjects

computational biology | systems biology | bioinformatics | sequence analysis | proteomics | sequence alignment | protein folding | structure prediction | network modeling | phylogenetics | pairwise sequence comparisons | ncbi | blast | protein structure | dynamic programming | genome sequencing | DNA | RNA | x-ray crystallography | NMR | homologs | ab initio structure prediction | DNA microarrays | clustering | proteome | computational annotation | BE.490J | 7.91 | 7.36 | BE.490 | 20.490

License

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7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

Serving as an introduction to computational biology, this course emphasizes the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis, structural analysis, and the analysis of complex biological systems. The principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction, and network modeling are covered. Students are also exposed to currently emerging research areas in the fields of computational and systems biology.

Subjects

computational biology | systems biology | bioinformatics | sequence analysis | proteomics | sequence alignment | protein folding | structure prediction | network modeling | phylogenetics | pairwise sequence comparisons | ncbi | blast | protein structure | dynamic programming | genome sequencing | DNA | RNA | x-ray crystallography | NMR | homologs | ab initio structure prediction | DNA microarrays | clustering | proteome | computational annotation | BE.490J | 7.91 | 7.36 | BE.490 | 20.490

License

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7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

Serving as an introduction to computational biology, this course emphasizes the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis, structural analysis, and the analysis of complex biological systems. The principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction, and network modeling are covered. Students are also exposed to currently emerging research areas in the fields of computational and systems biology.

Subjects

computational biology | systems biology | bioinformatics | sequence analysis | proteomics | sequence alignment | protein folding | structure prediction | network modeling | phylogenetics | pairwise sequence comparisons | ncbi | blast | protein structure | dynamic programming | genome sequencing | DNA | RNA | x-ray crystallography | NMR | homologs | ab initio structure prediction | DNA microarrays | clustering | proteome | computational annotation | BE.490J | 7.91 | 7.36 | BE.490 | 20.490

License

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7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains (proteins), determine their three-dimensional conformation. Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure, the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells, folding intermediates aggregation and competing off-pathway reactions, and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro. Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases, protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry, and diseases found associated with protein folding defects.

Subjects

amino acid sequence | polypeptide chains | sequence determinants | folding | synthesized polypeptide chains within cells | unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro | folding intermediates aggregation | competing off-pathway reactions | chaperonins | isomerases | helper proteins | protein recovery problems | biotechnology industry | protein folding defects | 3-D conformation | globular proteins | fibrous proteins | kinetics | in vitro refolding | pathways | in vivo folding | synthesized proteins | aggregation | protein misfolding | human disease | protein folding | genome sequences | 7.88 | 5.48 | 7.24 | 10.543

License

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18.100B Analysis I (MIT)

Description

Analysis I covers fundamentals of mathematical analysis: convergence of sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, uniformity, interchange of limit operations. MIT students may choose to take one of the two versions of 18.100. Option A chooses less abstract definitions and proofs, and gives applications where possible. Option B is more demanding and for students with more mathematical maturity; it places more emphasis on point-set topology and n-space, whereas Option A is concerned primarily with the real line.

Subjects

mathematical analysis | convergence of sequences | convergence of series | continuity | differentiability | Reimann integral | sequences and series of functions | uniformity | interchange of limit operations | utility of abstract concepts | construction of proofs | point-set topology | n-space | sequences of functions | series of functions | applications | real variable | metric space | sets | theorems | differentiate | differentiable | converge | uniform | 18.100

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7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to computational biology emphasizing the fundamentals of nucleic acid and protein sequence and structural analysis; it also includes an introduction to the analysis of complex biological systems. Topics covered in the course include principles and methods used for sequence alignment, motif finding, structural modeling, structure prediction and network modeling, as well as currently emerging research areas.

Subjects

7.91 | 20.490 | 20.390 | 7.36 | 6.802 | 6.874 | HST.506 | computational biology | systems biology | bioinformatics | artificial intelligence | sequence analysis | proteomics | sequence alignment | protein folding | structure prediction | network modeling | phylogenetics | pairwise sequence comparisons | ncbi | blast | protein structure | dynamic programming | genome sequencing | DNA | RNA | x-ray crystallography | NMR | homologs | ab initio structure prediction | DNA microarrays | clustering | proteome | computational annotation

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18.100C Analysis I (MIT) 18.100C Analysis I (MIT)

Description

This course is meant as a first introduction to rigorous mathematics; understanding and writing of proofs will be emphasized. We will cover basic notions in real analysis: point-set topology, metric spaces, sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, and integration. This course is meant as a first introduction to rigorous mathematics; understanding and writing of proofs will be emphasized. We will cover basic notions in real analysis: point-set topology, metric spaces, sequences and series, continuity, differentiability, and integration.

Subjects

analysis | analysis | sequences | sequences | series | series | continuity | continuity | differentiability | differentiability | Riemann | Riemann | uniformity | uniformity | limit operations | limit operations | proofs | proofs | point-set topology | point-set topology | n-space | n-space | communication | communication | writing | writing

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

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2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT) 2.875 Mechanical Assembly and Its Role in Product Development (MIT)

Description

The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly The course presents a systematic approach to design and assembly of mechanical assemblies, which should be of interest to engineering professionals, as well as post-baccalaureate students of mechanical, manufacturing and industrial engineering. It introduces mechanical and economic models of assemblies and assembly automation at two levels. "Assembly in the small" includes basic engineering models of part mating, and an explanation of the Remote Center Compliance. "Assembly in the large" takes a system view of assembly, including the notion of product architecture, feature-based design, and computer models of assemblies, analysis of mechanical constraint, assembly sequence analysis, tolerances, system-level design for assembly and JIT methods, and economics of assembly

Subjects

mechanical assembly | | mechanical assembly | | product development | | product development | | assembly automation | | assembly automation | | rigid part mating | | rigid part mating | | compliant part mating | | compliant part mating | | remote center compliance | | remote center compliance | | product architecture | | product architecture | | feature-based design | | feature-based design | | assembly sequence analysis | | assembly sequence analysis | | mechanical constraint analysis | | mechanical constraint analysis | | tolerances | | tolerances | | system-level design for assembly | | system-level design for assembly | | JIT methods | | JIT methods | | economics of assembly automation | | economics of assembly automation | | mass customization | | mass customization | | management of variety | | management of variety | | product family strategies | product family strategies

License

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8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | membranes | protein motors | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution | statistical physics | statistical physics | molecular biology | molecular biology | deoxyribonucleic acid | deoxyribonucleic acid | genes | genes | genetics | genetics | gene sequencing | gene sequencing | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | double helix | double helix | RNA | RNA | ribonucleic acid | ribonucleic acid | force | force | motion | motion | packaging | packaging | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | biochemistry | biochemistry | genome | genome | optimization | optimization | partitioning | partitioning | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | collective behavior | collective behavior

License

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

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17.556 Political Economy of Development (MIT) 17.556 Political Economy of Development (MIT)

Description

This course examines theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the process of late development. Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. How over the past century have some of the world's poorest nations achieved wealth? How have others remained mired in poverty? What are the social consequences for alternative strategies of development? This course examines theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the process of late development. Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. How over the past century have some of the world's poorest nations achieved wealth? How have others remained mired in poverty? What are the social consequences for alternative strategies of development?

Subjects

poverty | poverty | theoretical and empirical approaches | theoretical and empirical approaches | development | the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty | development | the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty | the politics of industrial policy and planning | the politics of industrial policy and planning | relationship between institutional change and growth | relationship between institutional change and growth | social consequences for alternative strategies of development | social consequences for alternative strategies of development

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