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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT) 5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca "Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | energy | environment | environment | society | society | energy initiative | energy initiative | project-based | project-based | energy management | energy management | project design | project design | renewable energy | renewable energy | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | transportation | transportation | wind power | wind power | wind mill | wind mill | energy recovery | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | infrastructure | climate | climate | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy calculator | energy calculator | solar power | solar power | solarthermal | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | greenhouse gas | emissions | emissions | turbines | turbines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy. This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-energy.xml

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT) 22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments. This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 22.081 | 2.650 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | energy transfer | clean technologies | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | energy conversion | wind power | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | carbon management options | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | eco-buildings | hydropower | hydropower

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-energy.xml

Attribution

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | hydropower

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | environment | society | energy initiative | project-based | energy management | project design | renewable energy | energy efficiency | transportation | wind power | wind mill | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | climate | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | energy calculator | solar power | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | emissions | turbines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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