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8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT) 8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation. This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation.

Subjects

general relativity | general relativity | big bang | big bang | cosmology | cosmology | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | early universe | early universe | cosmic background radiation | cosmic background radiation | primordial nucleosynthesis | primordial nucleosynthesis | standard model | standard model | electroweak and QCD phase transition | electroweak and QCD phase transition | group theory | group theory | grand unified theories | grand unified theories | baryon asymmetry | baryon asymmetry | monopoles | monopoles | cosmic strings | cosmic strings | domain walls | domain walls | axions | axions | inflationary universe | inflationary universe | structure formation | structure formation

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8.286 The Early Universe (MIT) 8.286 The Early Universe (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first part of the course deals with the classical cosmology, and later part with modern particle physics and its recent impact on cosmology.For more about Professor Guth's work, listen to this interview from WBUR, Boston's National Public Radio news station. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first part of the course deals with the classical cosmology, and later part with modern particle physics and its recent impact on cosmology.For more about Professor Guth's work, listen to this interview from WBUR, Boston's National Public Radio news station.

Subjects

special relativity | special relativity | big-bang theory | big-bang theory | Doppler effect | Doppler effect | Newtonian cosmological models | Newtonian cosmological models | non-Euclidean spaces | non-Euclidean spaces | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | early history of the universe | early history of the universe | grand unified theories | grand unified theories | particle theory | particle theory | baryogenesis | baryogenesis | inflationary universe model | inflationary universe model | evolution of galactic structure | evolution of galactic structure

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8.286 The Early Universe (MIT) 8.286 The Early Universe (MIT)

Description

The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first half deals with the development of the big-bang theory from 1915 to 1980, and latter half with recent impact of particle theory. The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first half deals with the development of the big-bang theory from 1915 to 1980, and latter half with recent impact of particle theory.

Subjects

special relativity | special relativity | Doppler effect | Doppler effect | Newtonian cosmological models | Newtonian cosmological models | non-Euclidean spaces | non-Euclidean spaces | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | early history of the universe | early history of the universe | big-bang theory | big-bang theory | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | grand unified theories | grand unified theories | particle theory | particle theory | baryogenesis | baryogenesis | inflationary | inflationary | evolution of galactic structure | evolution of galactic structure | inflationary universe model | inflationary universe model

License

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

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8.033 Relativity (MIT) 8.033 Relativity (MIT)

Description

Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay. Relativity is normally taken by physics majors in their sophomore year. Topics include: Einstein's postulates; consequences for simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, clock synchronization; Lorentz transformation; relativistic effects and paradoxes; Minkowski diagrams; invariants and four-vectors; momentum, energy and mass; and particle collisions. Also covered is: Relativity and electricity; Coulomb's law; and magnetic fields. Brief introduction to Newtonian cosmology. There is also an introduction to some concepts of General Relativity; principle of equivalence; the Schwarzchild metric; gravitational red shift, particle and light trajectories, geodesics, and Shapiro delay.

Subjects

Einstein's postulates | Einstein's postulates | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | consequences for simultaneity | time dilation | length contraction | clock synchronization | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | relativistic effects and paradoxes | relativistic effects and paradoxes | Minkowski diagrams | Minkowski diagrams | invariants and four-vectors | invariants and four-vectors | momentum | energy and mass | momentum | energy and mass | particle collisions | particle collisions | Relativity and electricity | Relativity and electricity | Coulomb's law | Coulomb's law | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | General Relativity | General Relativity | principle of equivalence | principle of equivalence | the Schwarzchild metric | the Schwarzchild metric | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | particle and light trajectories | geodesics | Shapiro delay | gravitational red shift | gravitational red shift | particle trajectories | particle trajectories | light trajectories | light trajectories | invariants | invariants | four-vectors | four-vectors | momentum | momentum | energy | energy | mass | mass | relativistic effects | relativistic effects | paradoxes | paradoxes | electricity | electricity | time dilation | time dilation | length contraction | length contraction | clock synchronization | clock synchronization | Schwarzchild metric | Schwarzchild metric | geodesics | geodesics | Shaprio delay | Shaprio delay | relativistic kinematics | relativistic kinematics | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | hubble expansion | hubble expansion | universe | universe | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | curved space time | curved space time | Ether Theory | Ether Theory | constants | constants | speed of light | speed of light | c | c | graph | graph | pythagorem theorem | pythagorem theorem | triangle | triangle | arrows | arrows

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402 | plusars | plusars | galaxies | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

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8.286 The Early Universe (MIT)

Description

The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first half deals with the development of the big-bang theory from 1915 to 1980, and latter half with recent impact of particle theory.

Subjects

special relativity | Doppler effect | Newtonian cosmological models | non-Euclidean spaces | thermal radiation | early history of the universe | big-bang theory | big-bang nucleosynthesis | grand unified theories | particle theory | baryogenesis | inflationary | evolution of galactic structure | inflationary universe model

License

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8.902 Astrophysics II (MIT) 8.902 Astrophysics II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence on astrophysics. Topics include galactic dynamics, groups and clusters on galaxies, phenomenological cosmology, Newtonian cosmology, Roberston-Walker models, and galaxy formation. This is the second course in a two-semester sequence on astrophysics. Topics include galactic dynamics, groups and clusters on galaxies, phenomenological cosmology, Newtonian cosmology, Roberston-Walker models, and galaxy formation.

Subjects

Galactic dynamics | Galactic dynamics | potential theory | potential theory | orbits | orbits | collisionless Boltzmann equations | collisionless Boltzmann equations | Galaxy interactions | Galaxy interactions | Groups and clusters | Groups and clusters | dark matter | dark matter | Intergalactic medium | Intergalactic medium | x-ray clusters | x-ray clusters | Active galactic nuclei | Active galactic nuclei | unified models | unified models | black hole accretion | black hole accretion | radio and optical jets | radio and optical jets | Homogeneity and isotropy | Homogeneity and isotropy | redshift | redshift | galaxy distance ladder | galaxy distance ladder | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | Roberston-Walker models and cosmography | Roberston-Walker models and cosmography | Early universe | Early universe | primordial nucleosynthesis | primordial nucleosynthesis | recombination | recombination | Cosmic microwave background radiation | Cosmic microwave background radiation | Large-scale structure | Large-scale structure | galaxy formation | galaxy formation

License

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8.942 Cosmology (MIT) 8.942 Cosmology (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of astrophysical cosmology with emphasis on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, galaxies and related phenomena at high redshift, and cosmic structure formation. Additional topics include cosmic inflation, nucleosynthesis and baryosynthesis, quasar (QSO) absorption lines, and gamma-ray bursts. Some background in general relativity is assumed. This course provides an overview of astrophysical cosmology with emphasis on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, galaxies and related phenomena at high redshift, and cosmic structure formation. Additional topics include cosmic inflation, nucleosynthesis and baryosynthesis, quasar (QSO) absorption lines, and gamma-ray bursts. Some background in general relativity is assumed.

Subjects

cosmology | cosmology | thermal background | thermal background | cosmological principle | cosmological principle | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | types of universes | types of universes | relativistic cosmology | relativistic cosmology | horizons | horizons | evolution in cosmology | evolution in cosmology | radiation | radiation | element synthesis | element synthesis | Cosmic Microwave Background radiation | Cosmic Microwave Background radiation | galaxies | galaxies | high redshift | high redshift | cosmic structure formation | cosmic structure formation

License

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21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT) 21L.709 Studies in Literary History: Modernism: From Nietzsche to Fellini (MIT)

Description

How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe. How do literature, philosophy, film and other arts respond to the profound changes in world view and lifestyle that mark the twentieth century? This course considers a broad range of works from different countries, different media, and different genres, in exploring the transition to a decentered "Einsteinian" universe.

Subjects

modernism | modernism | transition to a decentered “Einsteinian” universe | transition to a decentered “Einsteinian” universe | Friedrich Nietzsche | Friedrich Nietzsche | Paul Cézanne | Paul Cézanne | Arnold Schoenberg | Arnold Schoenberg | James Joyce | James Joyce | Franz Kafka | Franz Kafka | Fritz Lang | Fritz Lang | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | literary history | literary history

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT) 22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne

Subjects

plasma phenomena | plasma phenomena | energy generation | energy generation | controlled thermonuclear fusion | controlled thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | transport processes | charged particles | charged particles | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | plasma confinement schemes | plasma confinement schemes | MHD models | MHD models | simple equilibrium | simple equilibrium | stability analysis | stability analysis | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | wave propagation | wave propagation | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | streaming instabilities | fourth state of matter | fourth state of matter | plasma state | plasma state | visible universe | visible universe | economics | economics | plasmas | plasmas | motion of charged particles | motion of charged particles | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Debye Shielding | Debye Shielding | collective effects | collective effects | charged particle motion | charged particle motion | EM Fields | EM Fields | cross-sections | cross-sections | relaxation | relaxation | fluid plasma descriptions | fluid plasma descriptions | MHD equilibrium | MHD equilibrium | MHD dynamics | MHD dynamics | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | cold plasma waves | cold plasma waves | magnetic field | magnetic field | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | kinetic description of waves | kinetic description of waves | instabilities | instabilities | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | linear Landau growth | linear Landau growth | 22.611 | 22.611 | 6.651 | 6.651 | 8.613 | 8.613

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The Sun The Sun

Description

The Sun dominates our lives by defining our day, but how much do you know and understand about it? This free course will help you to explore the workings of the brightest star in our universe looking at its structure and the main processes taking place within it. You will also examine the phenomenon of sun spots. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as The Sun. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The Sun dominates our lives by defining our day, but how much do you know and understand about it? This free course will help you to explore the workings of the brightest star in our universe looking at its structure and the main processes taking place within it. You will also examine the phenomenon of sun spots. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as The Sun. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Physics and Astronomy | Physics and Astronomy | sun | sun | universe | universe | astronomy | astronomy | memory work | memory work | Fermanagh | Fermanagh | economic decline | economic decline | wavelength | wavelength | radiation | radiation

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21G.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT) 21G.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT)

Description

Ce cours est une introduction à la culture et la société françaises depuis la Révolution, mais surtout à partir du Second Empire. Nous tacherons de cerner ce qui définit la singularité francaise dans une perspective historique. Nous commencerons avec la notion "d'exception francaise" et de ce qui la constitue depuis la Révolution (La République, L'Universalisme, La Laicité, etc.) Nous explorerons l'impact de l'industrialisation, ainsi que la tension entre la France pays de la modernité dans les arts et la technologie et la France nostalgique de sa grandeur passée. Nous discuterons les moments charnières de cette tension avec les grands débats d'idées autour Ce cours est une introduction à la culture et la société françaises depuis la Révolution, mais surtout à partir du Second Empire. Nous tacherons de cerner ce qui définit la singularité francaise dans une perspective historique. Nous commencerons avec la notion "d'exception francaise" et de ce qui la constitue depuis la Révolution (La République, L'Universalisme, La Laicité, etc.) Nous explorerons l'impact de l'industrialisation, ainsi que la tension entre la France pays de la modernité dans les arts et la technologie et la France nostalgique de sa grandeur passée. Nous discuterons les moments charnières de cette tension avec les grands débats d'idées autour

Subjects

France | France | introduction | introduction | culture | culture | soci?t? | soci?t? | fran?aises | fran?aises | R?volution | R?volution | Second Empire | Second Empire | historique | historique | La R?publique | La R?publique | L'Universalisme | L'Universalisme | La Laicit? | La Laicit? | l'industrialisation | l'industrialisation | modernit? | modernit? | arts | arts | technologie | technologie | nostalgique | nostalgique | grandeur | grandeur | pass?e | pass?e | impressionistes | impressionistes | "Fleurs du Mal" | "Fleurs du Mal" | Paris de Haussmann | Paris de Haussmann | Tour Eiffel | Tour Eiffel | expositions universelles et coloniales | expositions universelles et coloniales | litt?raire | litt?raire | filmique | filmique | crises hexagonales | crises hexagonales | marqu? le 20e si?cle | marqu? le 20e si?cle | l'Affaire Dreyfus | l'Affaire Dreyfus | deux guerres mondiales le colonialisme | deux guerres mondiales le colonialisme | guerre d'Alg?rie | guerre d'Alg?rie | Mai 68 | Mai 68 | textes | textes | images | images | articles de journaux | articles de journaux | films | films | identit? Fran?aise. | identit? Fran?aise. | 21F.311 | 21F.311 | 21F.312 | 21F.312

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8.286 The Early Universe (MIT)

Description

The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first half deals with the development of the big-bang theory from 1915 to 1980, and latter half with recent impact of particle theory.

Subjects

special relativity | Doppler effect | Newtonian cosmological models | non-Euclidean spaces | thermal radiation | early history of the universe | big-bang theory | big-bang nucleosynthesis | grand unified theories | particle theory | baryogenesis | inflationary | evolution of galactic structure | inflationary universe model

License

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8.286 The Early Universe (MIT)

Description

The Early Universe provides an introduction to modern cosmology. The first part of the course deals with the classical cosmology, and later part with modern particle physics and its recent impact on cosmology.For more about Professor Guth's work, listen to this interview from WBUR, Boston's National Public Radio news station.

Subjects

special relativity | big-bang theory | Doppler effect | Newtonian cosmological models | non-Euclidean spaces | thermal radiation | early history of the universe | grand unified theories | particle theory | baryogenesis | inflationary universe model | evolution of galactic structure

License

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8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation.

Subjects

general relativity | big bang | cosmology | thermodynamics | early universe | cosmic background radiation | primordial nucleosynthesis | standard model | electroweak and QCD phase transition | group theory | grand unified theories | baryon asymmetry | monopoles | cosmic strings | domain walls | axions | inflationary universe | structure formation

License

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21F.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT)

Description

Ce cours est une introduction à la culture et la société françaises depuis la Révolution, mais surtout à partir du Second Empire. Nous tacherons de cerner ce qui définit la singularité francaise dans une perspective historique. Nous commencerons avec la notion "d'exception francaise" et de ce qui la constitue depuis la Révolution (La République, L'Universalisme, La Laicité, etc.) Nous explorerons l'impact de l'industrialisation, ainsi que la tension entre la France pays de la modernité dans les arts et la technologie et la France nostalgique de sa grandeur passée. Nous discuterons les moments charnières de cette tension avec les grands débats d'idées autour

Subjects

France | introduction | culture | soci?t? | fran?aises | R?volution | Second Empire | historique | La R?publique | L'Universalisme | La Laicit? | l'industrialisation | modernit? | arts | technologie | nostalgique | grandeur | pass?e | impressionistes | "Fleurs du Mal" | Paris de Haussmann | Tour Eiffel | expositions universelles et coloniales | litt?raire | filmique | crises hexagonales | marqu? le 20e si?cle | l'Affaire Dreyfus | deux guerres mondiales le colonialisme | guerre d'Alg?rie | Mai 68 | textes | images | articles de journaux | films | identit? Fran?aise.

License

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne

Subjects

plasma phenomena | energy generation | controlled thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | charged particles | magnetic fields | plasma confinement schemes | MHD models | simple equilibrium | stability analysis | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | wave propagation | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | fourth state of matter | plasma state | visible universe | economics | plasmas | motion of charged particles | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Debye Shielding | collective effects | charged particle motion | EM Fields | cross-sections | relaxation | fluid plasma descriptions | MHD equilibrium | MHD dynamics | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | cold plasma waves | magnetic field | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | kinetic description of waves | instabilities | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | linear Landau growth | 22.611 | 6.651 | 8.613

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | stars | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Universe | planets | planet formation | star formation | stellar evolution | supernovae | compact objects | white dwarfs | neutron stars | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | galaxy | universe | astrophysics | Sun | supernova | globular clusters | open clusters | jets | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | thermal history | normal galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | physics | Copernicus | Tycho | Kepler | Galileo | classical mechanics | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | matter | telescopes | detectors | 8.282 | 12.402 | plusars | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

License

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22.611J Introduction to Plasma Physics I (MIT)

Description

In this course, students will learn about plasmas, the fourth state of matter. The plasma state dominates the visible universe, and is of increasing economic importance. Plasmas behave in lots of interesting and sometimes unexpected ways. The course is intended only as a first plasma physics course, but includes critical concepts needed for a foundation for further study. A solid undergraduate background in classical physics, electromagnetic theory including Maxwell's equations, and mathematical familiarity with partial differential equations and complex analysis are prerequisites. The course introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics, coulomb collisions and transport processes, motion of charged particles in magne

Subjects

plasma phenomena | energy generation | controlled thermonuclear fusion | astrophysics | Coulomb collisions | transport processes | charged particles | magnetic fields | plasma confinement schemes | MHD models | simple equilibrium | stability analysis | Two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | wave propagation | kinetic theory | Vlasov plasma model | electron plasma waves | Landau damping | ion-acoustic waves | streaming instabilities | fourth state of matter | plasma state | visible universe | economics | plasmas | motion of charged particles | two-fluid hydrodynamic plasma models | Debye Shielding | collective effects | charged particle motion | EM Fields | cross-sections | relaxation | fluid plasma descriptions | MHD equilibrium | MHD dynamics | dynamics in two-fluid plasmas | cold plasma waves | magnetic field | microscopic to fluid plasma descriptions | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory.linear Landau growth | kinetic description of waves | instabilities | Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory | linear Landau growth | 22.611 | 6.651 | 8.613

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | artificial | intelligence | feedback | mechanism | speculative | thought | intelligent | agency | systems | design | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | history | conscious | selection | chance | unconscious | philosophy | human | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | self-guiding | self-sustaining | nature | unintelligent | mechanical | argument | evolution | creation | creationism | ethics | ethical | values | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | model | existence | objects | designer | purpose | literary texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | intellectual history | life | planet | natural history | material universe | theory of natural selection | argument from design | organisms | human design | conscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21W.739

License

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From Here to the Edge of the Observable Universe

Description

Authors:  Dr Robin Catchpole Lecture series presented by Dr Robin Catchpole, Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, formerly Senior Astronomer at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich Clicked 87 times. Last clicked 07/16/2014 - 02:14. Teaching & Learning Context:  This series of audio lectures is for people interested in astronomy who wish to learn more about the observable universe.

Subjects

Centre for Higher Education Development | Centre for Open Learning | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | astronomy | observable universe | Robin Catchpole | stars

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