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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course teaches fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is focused on object-oriented software design and development. Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java programming language is used. This course teaches fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is focused on object-oriented software design and development. Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java programming language is used.

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | object oriented | object oriented | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java | C | C | C++ | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course examines fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented software design and development. Students engage in active learning using laptop computers (available on loan). Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java® programming language is used. This course examines fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented software design and development. Students engage in active learning using laptop computers (available on loan). Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java® programming language is used.

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | object oriented | object oriented | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java | C | C | C++ | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering and scientific applications. Object-oriented software design and development is the focus of the course. Weekly programming problems cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. Emphasis is on developing techniques for solving problems in engineering, science, management, and planning. The Java® programming language is used. The course is worth 3 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .java files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recomm This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering and scientific applications. Object-oriented software design and development is the focus of the course. Weekly programming problems cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. Emphasis is on developing techniques for solving problems in engineering, science, management, and planning. The Java® programming language is used. The course is worth 3 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .java files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recomm

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | object oriented | object oriented | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java | C | C | C++ | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT) 1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of object-oriented software design and development, computational methods and sensing for engineering, and scientific and managerial applications. It cover topics, including design of classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, streams, threads, sensors, and data structures. Students use Java® programming language to complete weekly software assignments. How is 1.00 different from other intro programming courses offered at MIT? 1.00 is a first course in programming. It assumes no prior experience, and it focuses on the use of computation to solve problems in engineering, science and management. The audience for 1.00 is non-computer science majors. 1.00 does not focus on writing compilers or parsers or computing tools where t This course presents the fundamentals of object-oriented software design and development, computational methods and sensing for engineering, and scientific and managerial applications. It cover topics, including design of classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, streams, threads, sensors, and data structures. Students use Java® programming language to complete weekly software assignments. How is 1.00 different from other intro programming courses offered at MIT? 1.00 is a first course in programming. It assumes no prior experience, and it focuses on the use of computation to solve problems in engineering, science and management. The audience for 1.00 is non-computer science majors. 1.00 does not focus on writing compilers or parsers or computing tools where t

Subjects

computer | computer | engineering | engineering | problem solving | problem solving | software | software | software development | software development | programming | programming | graphical user interface | graphical user interface | numerical methods | numerical methods | data structures | data structures | sorting | sorting | searching | searching | computer graphics | computer graphics | Java | Java

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments. 6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | user interfaces | user interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | design principles | design principles | prototyping techniques | prototyping techniques | evaluation techniques | evaluation techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT) 6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho. This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo Šćepanović, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho.

Subjects

introduction to MATLAB | introduction to MATLAB | scripts | scripts | making variables | making variables | manipulating variables | manipulating variables | functions | functions | flow control | flow control | line plots | line plots | surface plots | surface plots | vectorization | vectorization | linear algebra | linear algebra | optimization | optimization | differential equations | differential equations | data structures | data structures | debugging | debugging | animation | animation | symbolic math | symbolic math | Simulink | Simulink | file input/output | file input/output | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT) MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester. This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester.

Subjects

Storytelling | Storytelling | human communication | human communication | representation | representation | causality | causality | live media | live media | recorded media | recorded media | computation | computation | user interface | user interface | interaction | interaction | digital media | digital media | information and story | information and story | authoring | authoring | interface | interface | computer-assisted storytelling | computer-assisted storytelling | cinema | cinema | film | film | television | television | mass media | mass media | narrative | narrative | voice | voice | information | information | story | story | character | character | dynamic situation | dynamic situation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course teaches fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is focused on object-oriented software design and development. Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java programming language is used.

Subjects

computer | engineering | problem solving | software | software development | object oriented | programming | graphical user interface | numerical methods | data structures | sorting | searching | computer graphics | Java | C | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course examines fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering, scientific and managerial applications. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented software design and development. Students engage in active learning using laptop computers (available on loan). Assignments cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. The Java® programming language is used.

Subjects

computer | engineering | problem solving | software | software development | object oriented | programming | graphical user interface | numerical methods | data structures | sorting | searching | computer graphics | Java | C | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents fundamental software development and computational methods for engineering and scientific applications. Object-oriented software design and development is the focus of the course. Weekly programming problems cover programming concepts, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, data structures, sorting and searching, computer graphics and selected advanced topics. Emphasis is on developing techniques for solving problems in engineering, science, management, and planning. The Java® programming language is used. The course is worth 3 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsAny number of development tools can be used to compile and run the .java files found on this course site. Please refer to the course materials for any specific instructions or recomm

Subjects

computer | engineering | problem solving | software | software development | object oriented | programming | graphical user interface | numerical methods | data structures | sorting | searching | computer graphics | Java | C | C++

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.00 Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of object-oriented software design and development, computational methods and sensing for engineering, and scientific and managerial applications. It cover topics, including design of classes, inheritance, graphical user interfaces, numerical methods, streams, threads, sensors, and data structures. Students use Java® programming language to complete weekly software assignments. How is 1.00 different from other intro programming courses offered at MIT? 1.00 is a first course in programming. It assumes no prior experience, and it focuses on the use of computation to solve problems in engineering, science and management. The audience for 1.00 is non-computer science majors. 1.00 does not focus on writing compilers or parsers or computing tools where t

Subjects

computer | engineering | problem solving | software | software development | programming | graphical user interface | numerical methods | data structures | sorting | searching | computer graphics | Java

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.845 Special Topics in Cinematic Storytelling (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores approaches to representation for distributed cinematic storytelling. The relationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed. Readings are drawn from literary and cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques; they develop a proposal using visualization techniques; and they prototype a working story experience, culminating in a final project displayed at the end of the semester.

Subjects

Storytelling | human communication | representation | causality | live media | recorded media | computation | user interface | interaction | digital media | information and story | authoring | interface | computer-assisted storytelling | cinema | film | television | mass media | narrative | voice | information | story | character | dynamic situation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | user interfaces | human capabilities | design principles | prototyping techniques | evaluation techniques

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.094 Introduction to MATLAB (MIT)

Description

This course provides an aggressively gentle introduction to MATLAB®. It is designed to give students fluency in MATLAB, including popular toolboxes. The course consists of interactive lectures with students doing sample MATLAB problems in real time. Problem-based MATLAB assignments are given which require significant time on MATLAB. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. Acknowledgements The 6.094 course materials were developed by Danilo ??epanovi?, Sourav R. Dey, Ankit Patel, and Patrick Ho.

Subjects

introduction to MATLAB | scripts | making variables | manipulating variables | functions | flow control | line plots | surface plots | vectorization | linear algebra | optimization | differential equations | data structures | debugging | animation | symbolic math | Simulink | file input/output | graphical user interfaces

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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