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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534. The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534.

Subjects

renewable energy | renewable energy | conservation | conservation | alternative power | alternative power | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | efficiency | efficiency | system analysis | system analysis | greenhouse | greenhouse | consumption | consumption | fuel | fuel | resource allocation | resource allocation | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy use | energy use | energy transfer | energy transfer | conversion | conversion | clean technologies | clean technologies | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | electrochemical energy | electrochemical energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | wind power | wind power | fusion energy | fusion energy | fossil energy | fossil energy | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | energy supply | energy supply | energy demand | energy demand | 10.391 | 10.391 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 2.65 | 2.65 | 3.564 | 3.564 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811ESD.166J | 22.811ESD.166J | ESD.166 | ESD.166

License

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT) 5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca "Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | energy | environment | environment | society | society | energy initiative | energy initiative | project-based | project-based | energy management | energy management | project design | project design | renewable energy | renewable energy | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | transportation | transportation | wind power | wind power | wind mill | wind mill | energy recovery | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | infrastructure | climate | climate | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy calculator | energy calculator | solar power | solar power | solarthermal | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | greenhouse gas | emissions | emissions | turbines | turbines

License

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT) 21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | energy | USA | USA | oil embargo | oil embargo | Gulf War | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | George Bush | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | fossil fuel | fossil fuel | automobiles | automobiles | suburbia | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | oil drilling | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | solar power | OPEC | OPEC | EPA | EPA | Earth Day | Earth Day | environmentalism | environmentalism | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Levittown | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT) 22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments. This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 22.081 | 2.650 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | energy transfer | clean technologies | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | energy conversion | wind power | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | carbon management options | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | eco-buildings | hydropower | hydropower

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the

Subjects

Assessment of energy systems | Assessment of energy systems | resources | resources | extraction | extraction | conversion | conversion | and end-use | and end-use | regional and global energy needs | regional and global energy needs | 21st century | 21st century | sustainable manner | sustainable manner | renewable and conventional energy technologies | renewable and conventional energy technologies | biomass energy | biomass energy | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | solar energy | solar energy | hydrogen fuel | hydrogen fuel | fusion energy | fusion energy | analysis of energy technology systems | analysis of energy technology systems | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT) EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop Includes audio/video content: AV lectures, AV special element video. D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international develop

Subjects

sustainable energy | sustainable energy | renewable energy | renewable energy | green energy | green energy | sustainable development | sustainable development | third world | third world | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | solar power | solar power | wind power | wind power | micro-hydro power | micro-hydro power | design | design | co-creation | co-creation | Nicaragua | Nicaragua

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT) EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

EC.701 | EC.701 | 11.025 | 11.025 | 11.472 | 11.472 | development project | development project | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | intermediate technology | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | stakeholder analysis | China | China | India | India | Rwanda | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Tanzania | Africa | Africa | developing country | developing country | international development | international development | third world | third world | poverty | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | latrine | grain mill | grain mill | solar energy | solar energy | stove | stove | energy | energy | charcoal | charcoal | wheelchair | wheelchair | water | water | water quality | water quality | safe water | safe water | water treatment | water treatment | health | health | sanitation | sanitation | World Bank | World Bank | NGO | NGO | United Nations | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4D | ICT4C | ICT4C | microfinance | microfinance | micro-finance | micro-finance | AIDS | AIDS | HIV | HIV | wind power | wind power | solar power | solar power | biomass | biomass | biodiesel | biodiesel | biogas | biogas | agriculture | agriculture | farming | farming | food | food | green revolution | green revolution | millenium development goals | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.775 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international development.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate

Subjects

sustainable energy | renewable energy | green energy | sustainable development | third world | appropriate technology | solar power | wind power | micro-hydro power | design | co-creation | Nicaragua

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.721 D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

development project | appropriate technology | sustainable development | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | China | India | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Africa | developing country | international development | third world | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | grain mill | solar energy | stove | energy | charcoal | wheelchair | water | water quality | safe water | water treatment | health | sanitation | World Bank | NGO | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4C | microfinance | micro-finance | AIDS | HIV | wind power | solar power | biomass | biodiesel | biogas | agriculture | farming | food | green revolution | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Energy resources: Wind energy

Description

Level: Intermediate

Subjects

wind energy | wind power | wind turbine | geesoer | ukoer | geography | environmental science | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the

Subjects

Assessment of energy systems | resources | extraction | conversion | and end-use | regional and global energy needs | 21st century | sustainable manner | renewable and conventional energy technologies | biomass energy | fossil fuels | geothermal energy | nuclear power | wind power | solar energy | hydrogen fuel | fusion energy | analysis of energy technology systems | political | social | economic | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534.

Subjects

renewable energy | conservation | alternative power | thermodynamics | efficiency | system analysis | greenhouse | consumption | fuel | resource allocation | sustainable energy | energy use | energy transfer | conversion | clean technologies | nuclear energy | electrochemical energy | biomass energy | wind power | fusion energy | fossil energy | solar thermal energy | energy supply | energy demand | 10.391 | 1.818 | 2.65 | 3.564 | 11.371 | 22.811ESD.166J | ESD.166

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | USA | oil embargo | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | nuclear power | wind power | fossil fuel | automobiles | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | global warming | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | OPEC | EPA | Earth Day | environmentalism | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | hydropower

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.701J D-Lab I: Development (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Development addresses issues of technological improvements at the micro level for developing countries—in particular, how the quality of life of low-income households can be improved by adaptation of low cost and sustainable technologies. Discussion of development issues as well as project implementation challenges are addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with mostly local level organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Project team meetings focus on developing specific projects and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the countries and localities to

Subjects

EC.701 | 11.025 | 11.472 | development project | appropriate technology | sustainable development | intermediate technology | stakeholder analysis | China | India | Rwanda | Sierra Leone | Tanzania | Africa | developing country | international development | third world | poverty | bottom of the pyramid;cooking | latrine | grain mill | solar energy | stove | energy | charcoal | wheelchair | water | water quality | safe water | water treatment | health | sanitation | World Bank | NGO | United Nations | ICT4D | ICT4C | microfinance | micro-finance | AIDS | HIV | wind power | solar power | biomass | biodiesel | biogas | agriculture | farming | food | green revolution | millenium development goals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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EC.711 D-Lab: Energy (MIT)

Description

D-Lab: Energy offers a hands-on, project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of small-scale, sustainable energy technology in developing countries where compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating power are required. Projects may include micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity both to travel to Nicaragua during spring break to identify and implement projects. D-Lab: Energy is part of MIT's D-Lab program, which fosters the development of appropriate technologies and sustainable solutions within the framework of international development.This course is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate

Subjects

sustainable energy | renewable energy | green energy | sustainable development | third world | appropriate technology | solar power | wind power | micro-hydro power | design | co-creation | Nicaragua

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | environment | society | energy initiative | project-based | energy management | project design | renewable energy | energy efficiency | transportation | wind power | wind mill | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | climate | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | energy calculator | solar power | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | emissions | turbines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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